Archive for September, 2013

What is the Role of Th1 and Th2 cells in Autoimmune Disease?

Thursday, September 19th, 2013

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What is the Role of Th1 and Th2 in Autoimmune Disease?

This article was originally written as a guest post for The Paleo Mom

FROM NEW LEAF:  This is a fantastically written article about T Helper 1 & 2 cells and how Auto-Immune is linked, which disorders are considered T Helper 1 or 2 dominant.  All of which we treat at New Leaf Natural Therapies. 

Those that suffer from autoimmune disease commonly experience symptoms that stem from imbalances within the functioning of their immune system. There are many factors that can influence this balance – stress, nutrition, vitamin and mineral deficiencies, gut flora, and allergies, among others. This way of looking at autoimmune disease is a growing trend in the alternative field, highlighted through the work of Datis Kharrazian.

What are Th1 and Th2?

T-helper cells (abbreviated as Th) are a vital part of the immune system. They are lymphocytes (types of white blood cells) that recognize foreign pathogens, or in the case of autoimmune disease, normal tissue. In response to this recognition, they produce cytokines, which are hormonal messenger proteins that are responsible for the biological effects of the immune system. They are divided into subgroups as follows:

Th1: Th1 cells are involved in what is called “cell-mediated” immunity, which usually deals with infections by viruses and certain bacteria. They are the body’s first line of defense against pathogens that get inside our cells. They tend to be pro-inflammatory and are involved in the development of organ-specific autoimmune disease.

Th2: Th2 cells are involved in what is called “humoral-mediated” immunity, which deals with bacteria, toxins, and allergens. They are responsible for stimulating the production of antibodies in response to extracellular pathogens (those found in blood or other body fluids). They tend not to be inflammatory and are involved in systemic autoimmune disease and other chronic conditions.

In a well-functioning immune system, both groups of these T helper cells work together to keep the system balanced. One side might become more active to eradicate a threat, then settling back to a balanced level.

How does this affect autoimmune disease?

In some people with autoimmune disease, patterns showing a dominance to either the Th1 or Th2 pathway have been shown. Although there are exceptions, the following table shows the conditions that are most commonly associated with a Th1 or Th2 dominant state:

TH1 dominant conditions:

Type I diabetes Multiple sclerosis Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis Grave’s Disease Crohn’s Disease Psoriasis Sjoren’s Syndrome Celiac Disease Lichen Planus Rheumatoid Arthritis Chronic viral infections

TH2 dominant conditions: 

Lupus Allergic Dermatitis Scleroderma Atopic Eczema Sinusitis Inflammatory Bowel Disease Asthma Allergies Cancer Ulcerative Colitis Multiple chemical sensitivity

When the th1 cells of the immune system are overactive, they can suppress the activity of th2 and vice versa. This can be problematic because these two components of the immune system function in a delicately balanced relationship. In the case of autoimmune disease, imbalance can further the attack on healthy tissue, thereby worsening symptoms.

Although research can lump those with certain conditions under the Th1/2 categories, in reality they can be all over the map. For instance, although most Hashimoto’s patients present a Th1 dominance, some can be Th2. It is also possible to have both Th1 and Th2 simultaneously overactive or under-active. Pregnancy can shift the immune system temporarily to Th2, which is why a lot of women find out they have Hashimoto’s after they give birth and their immune system returns to Th1 dominance.

How do I find out if I am Th1 or Th2 dominant?

AT New Leaf we provide Live Blood Screenings from which we do a white blood cell count – the count of neutrophils, lymphocytes and monocytes, along with eosinophils, let us know a huge amount about your immune system.

There are effective treatments, supplements, processes we use that can help to start the process of regulating your immune system.

Ask about:

  • kinesiology for the immune system (NOT)
  • kinesiology for finding out if your body is recognising foods, supplements, viruses, bacteria
  • live blood screenings
  • remedial massage and microcurrent for pain

3348 6098

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Mitochondrial Disease

Tuesday, September 17th, 2013

New Leaf Notes:

This is a great article about the challenges to do with Mitochondrial Disease.  Unlike the medical profession which looks for a ‘drug’ to correct a cellular imbalance we look at Mitochondrial Disease in the following way:

  • high levels nutrition
  • sensible nutrition based on science and what YOUR body can handle
  • detoxification of cell walls and mitochondria
  • enhancing stem cell production and telomere health
  • dealing with stress and pain symptomatically whilst correcting the underlying causes.
  • doing live blood screenings and bio-impedance screenings to see results / improvement / deterioration so that we can adjust our programme.  Generally inflammation improves, but detoxification can create minor side-effects in the short term

3348 6098

 

Struggle against disease

      By                       Michèle Jedlicka          

  • Andrew and Hilary Fuller frequently face the challenges presented by mitochondrial disease.Andrew and Hilary Fuller frequently face the challenges presented by mitochondrial disease.

This week heralds awareness of two debilitating health issues. Dementia Awareness week began yesterday and World Alzheimer’s Day is on Saturday.

It is also awareness week for a less well-known disease. Global Mitochondrial Disease Awareness Week is a time where mitochondrial disease-related organisations from all around the world join forces to promote our joint cause- to find a cure for mitochondrial disease.

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Local resident Andrew Fuller, 72, was diagnosed with a mild form of MD about four years ago, the specialist pinpointing the cause to be the Statin medication he had been taking for his cholesterol. Blood tests profiled a rising item in the results.

Andrew’s wife Hilary said: “Nobody seemed to know what it was until he had a muscle biopsy and they said, ‘This is what it is you’ve got Mitochondrial disease. Mild mitochondrial myopathy.’

“He wakes every morning being sore; his muscles are sore, his forearms, his forearms, his legs. He says it’s a feeling, while there’s tingling with it…but the other part is that the feeling after you’ve had a cramp… an ache that’s left with you with that. Fatigue is the other thing.” Andrew finds he frequently has to rest after breakfast.

He often finds it painful to stand for any length of time, to walk any distance or climb up into tractor cabs.

“He was always a very mobile man,” said Hilary. “He used to play football until he was 60 … gone-so that part of his life has changed completely.”

Mitochondrial disease is a complex genetic mutation when mitochondria within body cells have a predisposition to fail early. Mitochondria are found in all cells except for red blood cells, and convert fuel from food into pure energy called ATP to power cell nuclei and so promote healthy cell function, be it a brain cell, a muscle cell or a nerve cell.

The Australian Mitochondrial Disease Foundation, established in 2009, explains: “Since the high energy organs require so many mitochondria within their cells, they are usually the first to be affected in mitochondrial disease. These include the brain (using 20 per cent of our total energy), nerves, muscles, eyes, ears, heart, bowels, liver, kidney and pancreas.”

Symptoms range widely including dementia, chronic pain, stroke, abdominal and digestive malfunction, blindness or deafness, seizures, neuro-psychiatric disturbances and fatigue and exhaustion which are most common, to name a few.

There is no cure and few effective treatments. The principal rule is ‘energy balance equation’. As rest is mandatory for the mitochondria to ‘catch up’ with body function, Sunday, September 22 is “Stay in Bed Day’, a global event to support those who have to rest to stay on top of MD.

The AMD Foundation states: “Recent research demonstrates that mitochondrial mutations are present in at least one in 250 people and that at least one in 5000 will develop serious illness.” Many are children.

“The woman who’s the powerhouse behind the information phone help-line, has two children, both of which have got mitochondrial disease,” Hilary said. “And the girl has had a number of strokes as a result of her manifestation of the disease and now has dementia…she’s about 12 or 14.”

Dementia Awareness Week is the national flagship week for Alzheimer Australia’s community awareness activities each year. The theme this year is Brain Health: Making the Connections. This theme gives organisations and individuals an opportunity to get involved in promoting brain-healthy lifestyles, promoting early detection and raising awareness of dementia.

The Australian Department for Health and Ageing defines dementia as “an umbrella term describing a syndrome associated with more than 100 different diseases that are characterised by the impairment of brain functions. Although the type and severity of symptoms and their pattern of development varies with the type of dementia, it is usually of gradual onset, progressive in nature and irreversible.

“In 2011, there was an estimated 298,000 people living with dementia in Australia. Among Australians aged 65 and over, almost 1 in 10 (nine per cent) had dementia. And among those aged 85 and over, 3 in 10 (30 per cent) had dementia.

The term Younger Onset Dementia refers to people aged under 65 who are living with dementia. In 2011 there was an estimated 23,900 Australians living with younger onset dementia.

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“Dementia was the third leading cause of death in 2010, with 9003 deaths recorded across Australia. For people aged 65 and over, dementia was the second leading cause of burden of disease and the leading cause of disability burden.”

HCG Weight loss: hydration, muscle mass, fat mass, rebalancing hormones…

Wednesday, September 4th, 2013
Here’s my rant about HCG weight loss again… Weight loss is only one component of HCG balancing the body…  The reason we love HCG at New Leaf Natural Therapies is because it works, it’s safe, we’ve used it on hundreds of clients, it’s detoxifying, it re-boots the body’s metabolism and it’s easy!  We always want to see a change on the scales when we’re doing any weight-loss process, it’s natural.  However, so much else is going on in the body during HCG, that the more challenged our body is to start with the more likely we are to have slower weight loss.
YES, on average our clients lose 4-10 kilos in 23 days and 10-20 kilos in 40 days…
Chronically dehydrated people will lose less weight because they will re-hydrate throughout the process
Chronically under-muscle-massed people (about 40% of us) will gain muscle mass and re-hydrate throughout the process thereby losing less weight….
Don’t be annoyed at the number on the scales.  If you are doing HCG properly, and choosing the foods consistently that you get the best results with, you will achieve your goals!
If you’re really interested, have weekly VLA Bio-impedance screenings so that you KNOW what is going on in the body.
Knowledge is power.  Knowledge gives motivation.  The better balanced your body is:  muscles, hydration, muscle quality and hormonal balance – the more fat loss you’ll achieve throughout HCG.
Brisbane HCG Specialists
New Leaf Natural Therapies
healthteam@newleafnaturaltherapies.com.au
0417 643 849

Mock Meringue Cookies!!

Monday, September 2nd, 2013
Mock Meringue Cookie!!
Found this awesome recipe for a mock “meringue” cookie. Its made from egg white so it’s a good source of protein. I am working out a bit now and I usually pop a few of these before my workout so I can have extra energy and don’t feel light headed. They haven’t stalled my weight loss! Enjoy
3 Egg whites   Pinch of cream of tartar   Pinch of salt   1/2 t vanilla (or almond) extract   Stevia   Beat e…gg whites, tartar, vanilla, and salt until stiff peaks form. Drop by teaspoonful’s on cookie sheet lined with foil. Bake in 250 oven for 20 minutes.
**tips and tricks*****I turn the griller on for a few second in order to get them to have a golden top
***I usually sprinkle a little stevia (to taste) on top of the cookies instead of adding it while baking as stevia tends to be bitter if baked.
***I have also sprinkled them with a mixture of cinnamon, stevia and a dash of nutmeg. YUM!