Archive for the ‘ADD/ADHD’ Category

LEAP: Learning Enhancement Acupressure Programme – developed by Dr Charles Krebs

Thursday, October 5th, 2017

Logical Creative Brain

LEAP:  What Is It?

LEAP is an Applied Physiology (Kinesiology) protocol which activates areas of the brain which are not currently being accessed fully.  It uses a bio-feedback mechanism which accurately measures inability for specific parts of the brain to function.

Kinesiology uses muscle testing to access specific areas of the brain.  We use acupuncture points (no needles) which have been clinically shown to increase neuronal flow (nerve pathways), glial cell function, increases nutrition and oxygen  to these areas, thereby allowing better function.

LEAP, in combination with adequate brain nutrition and reduction in brain toxins, allows us to be the best we can be!

The inactivity of these areas causes any combination of learning difficulties:

  • comprehension problems,
  • switching of letters (p&d, q&b) maths,
  • poor visual integration
  • poor auditory memory
  • concentration problems (or daydreaming),
  • many  symptoms such as clumsiness and co-ordination difficulties.
  • Stress & inability to remember under stress
  • Higher level comprehension and so much more

The areas of dysfunction in the brain include the frontal lobes (higher thinking functions), logic brain (left side) and gestalt brain – your creative/emotional (right side), along with too much information in the form of fear patterns being stored in the amygdala, causing day to day disruption of brain function.

LEAP:  Who Can Benefit?

Children and adults with learning problems will often be on a Stress Avoidance Cycle, which means the brain will switch off rather than allow the stress of not being able to handle a problem.

Any person who wishes to utilise their brain at the optimum level will benefit by LEAP.

LEAP opens up the pathways in the brain and allows free thinking within any subject, ie, maths/English, and reduces stress associated with fatigue, fluoro lights, computer radiation, mobile phone stress and other common allergens (such as sugars, wheat, candida)

  • Students of all ages
  • People requiring brain power at work
  • Kids with behaviour issues, ADD, ADHD, Autism, Aspergers
  • Post-stroke, post operation poor memory
  • Kids who have had glue ear, birthing problems, vaccine side-effects, stress (such as having siblings!)
  • Kids with poor writing ability, neck & shoulder issues, headaches & migraines

LEAP:  Who Developed It?

Dr Charles Krebs, author of ‘Revolutionary Way of Thinking’ (highly recommended for anyone interested in understanding brain function and integration or the fundamentals of LEAP) is a scientist who had an accident in the 1980’s, which left part of his brain permanently damaged.  When he found Kinesiology, it ultimately changed his life…allowing access to pathways which had ‘shut down’ since his accident.

Dr Krebs not only became a Kinesiologist, but took the protocols one step further and has developed and researched LEAP techniques on over 8000 people.

Dr Krebs currently works in research facilities at Harvard, Germany, Switzerland & London.

LEAP:  Gives Results!!

LEAP is currently having between 80-98% success rate.  Medically, nothing has been found to change the physiology of the brain (in other words, nothing increases brain function), whereas LEAP does!

 

It is a protocol which requires a number of treatments (10-20) and these treatments can be spaced to suit any budget or timeframe.  Children often need a ‘top-up’ every few years when major hormonal or growth spurts take place.  If children or adults are incredibly neurologically disturbed, it may take much longer!  This doesn’t mean that improvements won’t be seen earlier on, it’s about working with the person’s brain & body, finding the deficits and correcting them one by one (in the most neurologically correct order!!)

LEAP truly is revolutionary and should be considered with any learning difficulties, ADD, ADHD and dyslexia.

BREAKTHROUGH FOR DYSLEXIA AND LEARNING DISABILITIES

  • Constantly bumping into things or dropping things.
  • Difficulty in following motion or moving things (balls, people, traffic).
  • Difficulty in following sequential instructions or events.
  • Difficulty in understanding words in normal conversation.
  • Difficulty with reading, writing and mathematics.
  • Doing opposite of what was told.
  • Dysequilibrium (balance dysfunction).
  • Feelings of inferiority, stupidity, clumsiness.
  • Get drowsy or tend to fall asleep while driving on a highway or open road.
  • Gets lost easily or all the time.
  • Inability to concentrate, even when involved in a particular activity, such as a game.
  • Inability to organise daily activities, particularly in allotting proper time.
  • Inability to relate to people in groups or to understand the conversation.
  • Inability to remember numbers.
  • Little or no concept of time
  • Need to reread the same word or phrase to get any meaning out of it.
  • Poor motor coordination.
  • Poor or non-existent sense of direction
  • Sharp emotional or mood swings.
  • Stuttering, hesitant speech, poor word recall.
  • Unable to, or unsure in making decisions.
  • Various phobias (including height), motion-related (elevators, bridges, etc.)

 

And many, many more.  This is a multi-faceted condition, which escapes detection many times because of its diverse symptomatology.

Discuss a kinesiology programme for you or your child at New Leaf Natural Therapies.

Check out our You Tube Channel:  New Leaf Health Team

Madonna Guy ND
New Leaf Natural Therapies
07 3348 6098
healthteam@newleafnaturaltherapies.com.au

 

LEAP: The Learning Enhancement Acupressure Program – by Dr Charles T. Krebs

Tuesday, July 26th, 2016

We’ve been doing kinesiology at New Leaf Natural Therapies for 20 years.  LEAP is an integrative approach to supporting better brain function – for moods, stress, survival patterns, learning problems, damaging behaviours, anxiety, suicidal thoughts…

LEAP®: The Learning Enhancement Acupressure Program: Correcting

Learning and Memory Problems with Acupressure and Kinesiology.

By Dr. Charles T. Krebs

ABSTRACT:

The Learning Enhancement Acupressure Program, or LEAP®, has been developed since 1985 inconjunction with clinical psychologists, speech pathologists, neurologists and other health professionals, as a very effective program for the correction of most learning difficulties. LEAP® is based on a new model of learning integrating recent concepts in neurophysiology of the brain and uses highly specific acupressure formatting to address stress within specific brain structures. The application of specific non-invasive acupressure and other energetic techniques can then resolve these stresses resulting in a return to normal function.

In the LEAP® model of learning Gestalt and Logic functions are not simply localised in the right or left cerebral hemisphere as in the popular Right Brain/Left Brain model of learning. But rather, each type of conscious brain function or process appears to have a cerebral “lead” function that is either predominantly Gestalt (Visuo-spatial, Global) or Logic (Linear, Sequential) in nature. These cortical “lead” functions provide a “point of entry” into a widely distributed system comprising many subconscious cortical sub-modules in both hemispheres and many subconscious subcortical modules throughout the limbic system and brainstem.

While the Gestalt and Logic “lead” functions are conscious, these functions are dependent upon many levels of subconscious sensory processing at many levels within the nervous system. While this processing through multiplexing and parallel processing at many different levels is highly efficient, it means that brain processing is “time bound”. Since many components of any mental function are performed in many different parts of the brain, and often at different speeds, coherent output in the form of “thinking” requires integration and synchronisation of all of these separate processes.

Loss of integrated brain function, termed loss of Brain Integration in LEAP®, thus results in the loss of a specific mental capacity, the ability to perform a specific type of mental task. When these specific mental capacities are required for academic performance, their loss can result in Specifi Learning Disabilities.

Specific Learning Disabilities (SLDs) arise in this model by either lack of access to specific subconscious processing modules, either cortical or subcortical, or the de-synchronisation of neural flows in the integrative pathways linking processing modules. Thus to resolve SLDs, you need only “open up” access to the “blocked” processing modules or re-synchronise the timing of information flow between them to re-instate integrated brain function.

The LEAP® program provides an integrated acupressure protocol using direct muscle biofeedback (kinesiology) as a tool to identify “stress” within specific brain nuclei and areas that have “blocked” integrated function. The application of the LEAP® acupressure protocol using acupressure and other energetic based techniques to re-synchronise brain function resolves learning and memory problems in a high percent of cases.

HISTORY OF SPECIFIC LEARNING DIFFICULTIES.

Difficulties with learning academic tasks such as reading, spelling and mathematics have been recognised for over a century, with Kussmaul in 1877 ascribed as the first person to specifically describe an inability to read, that persisted in the presence of intact sight and speech, as word blindness.1 The word dyslexia was coined by Berlin in 1887.2 Within a decade a Glasgow eye surgeon James Hinschelwood (1895) and a Seaford General Practitioner Pringle Morgan (1896) observed students who were incapable of learning to read and hypothesised that this was based on a failure of development of the relevant brain areas which were believed to be absent or abnormal.

This model was based on the assumption that developmental dyslexia (congenital dyslexia) was similar in form to acquired dyslexia, which is dyslexia due to brain damage after a person has already learned to read. Deficits in other types of learning, such as mathematics, would also result from some other underlying brain damage or abnormality.3

Work in the early part of the twentieth century, particularly by Samuel T. Orton in the 1920s and 1930s suggested that learning difficulties such as dyslexia were not based on anatomical absence or abnormality, but rather it was delay in the development of various areas that caused these dysfunctions. This belief was largely ignored until the 1960s when it was revived by a growing interest in neuropsychology. However, more recent developments in neuropsychology and neurophysiology support the hypothesis that dysfunctions within the brain, both anatomical and developmental, may be causal in many learning problems.4

It was not until 1963, in an address given by Samuel Kirk, who argued for better descriptions of children’s school problems that the term “learning disabilities” originated. Since that time there’s been a proliferation of labels that attempt to dissociate the learning disabled from the retarded and brain damaged.

Definitions

In the context of this synopsis, Specific Learning Disorders or Disabilities (SLDs) relates to problems with physical co-ordination and acquiring the academic skills of reading, writing, spelling and mathematics including both Dyslexia and Attention Deficit Disorder (ADD) with or without hyperactivity. ADD with hyperactivity is now commonly called Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) or hyperkinetic disorder in Europe. Historically, Dyslexia has been widely defined in terms of deficits in the areas of reading, spelling and language. However, more recent conceptualisations have included a definition that also encompasses a wide range of problems, including clumsiness and difficulty with rote learning.5 Fawcett and Nicolson have also challenged the prevailing hypothesis that Dyslexia is merely a language based problem, suggesting that it might be a more generalised deficit in the acquisition of skills.6

The term Dyslexia is not defined in the DSM IV (1994) although it is still commonly used in literature discussing various learning difficulties. The term Learning Disorders (DSM IV) currently encompasses various types of learning difficulties including dyslexia and Attention Deficit Disorder (ADD). Learning Disorders are defined in the DSM IV as being essentially a persistent pattern of inattention and/or hyperactivity-impulsivity that is more frequent and severe than is typically observed in individuals at a comparable level of development. The performance of these individuals on standardised tests for reading, mathematics, or written expression is substantially below, more than 2 standard deviations (SDs), same age peers even though their IQ scores are average or above average.7

Incidence

Frequently, children diagnosed as learning disabled are also inattentive and deficient in linguistic skills, most often in reading.8 Rutter and Yule examined a large population of children from a number of different studies and found 3.5% of Isle of Wight 10-year-olds, 4.5% of 14-year-olds and over 6% of London 10-year-olds showed reading difficulties.9 Gaddes looked at the proportion of children with learning disorders in various studies in both North America and Europe and found that the need for special training for learning disorders ranged between 10-15% of the school age population.10 However, estimates of the prevalence of learning disorders for broad age ranges is problematic because a learning disability is an emergent problem that is often not evident until later years in schooling. Using the criteria of defining learning disorders as being two years behind on standardised tests, less than 1% of 6-year-olds are disabled, 2% of 7-year-olds and so on until at age 19, 25% would be classified as learning disabled. So these children fall progressively behind as they mature and the complexity of work increases.11 In an address given by the Australian Federal Schools Minister, Dr David Kemp, in October 1996, Kemp stated that a study of 28,000 students in four surveys in Australia found 30% of year 9 students lacked basic literacy skills. This high incidence of learning disorders in school children indicates a need for effective treatment. Studies in other countries, both English, French and German support these figures, so specific learning difficulties, which cover all types of learning disabilities from dyslexia, reading problems, ADD to ADHD, probably represent greater than 15% of school-aged children, and may be as high as one third of all school-aged children.

Causes

Currently hypotheses concerning learning disorders suggest that they are primarily the result of one or more of five major factors;

1) structural damage,
2) brain dysfunction,
3) abnormal cerebral lateralisation,
4) maturational lag and
5) environment deprivation.

While none of these theories is unequivocally supported by current data, all of these factors may contribute in varying degrees to learning disabilities.12

Brain damage and overt brain dysfunction would appear to account for a relatively small percentage of children with learning disorders. The great majority of other children with learning disorders do not typically show many of the neurological symptoms associated with brain damage in adults. For instance, EEG and CT studies have not shown structural damage and abnormal EEGs correlated with known brain damage are not consistently observed in children with learning disorders.13 Rather than direct brain damage, there is evidence that abnormal physiological or biochemical processes may be responsible for malfunction in some part of the cerebral cortex.

Electrophysiological recording studies have associated specific high frequency EEG and AEP (averaged evoked potentials) abnormalities with various types of learning disorders.14 Recent studies with SSVEP (Steady state visual evoked potential) have shown that children diagnosed with Attention Deficit Disorder demonstrate similar abnormal SSVEP patterns when compared to normal subjects while performing the same cognitive task.15 The brain dysfunction hypothesis suggests that the dysfunction may be a consequence of defective arousal mechanisms resulting in some form of inadequate cerebral activation.16

This is supported by studies of children with learning disorders that show they have difficulty on continuous performance tests requiring attention and low distractibility; had slower reaction times to stimuli, and increased errors due to impulsivity on tests of visual searching.17 Douglas proposed that the deficits on these tasks resulted from inadequate cerebral activation. Learning disorders of some types at least, do improve with drugs like amphetamines that cause cerebral activation via increasing subcortical arousal. In fact this is the basis of treating hyperactive children with Ritalin.18

An alternative model of learning disorders is based on recent neurophysiological findings that suggest it is the timing and synchronisation of neural activity in separate brain areas that creates high order cognitive functions. Any loss or malfunction of the timing mechanism may cause disintegration of neural activity and hence dysfunction in cognitive tasks.19 Clearly, brain dysfunction due to inadequate cerebral activation may indeed lead to disruption of the timing and synchronisation of neural flows, and thus these two hypotheses may just be different aspects of the same process.

This model supports the approach in the Learning Enhancement Advanced Program (LEAP®) that Dr. Krebs developed in the late 1980s early 1990s.20 In the LEAP® Model, Specific Learning Disorders are based on the disruption or loss of timing and synchronisation between the neural activity in the diverse brain regions, both cortical and subcortical, that must be synchronised in order for successful integration to produce normal cognitive activity. Learning disorders would arise in this model from a lack of integration of functions that occur simultaneously in separate brain regions.

If the brain does integrate separate processes into meaningful combinations we call ‘thought’ or cognitive ability, then the main risk is mis-timing or loss of synchronisation between these processes. To quote Damasio “any malfunction of the timing mechanism would be likely to create spurious integration or disintegration”.21 For synchronous firing of neurons in many separate brain areas to create cognitive functions would require maintenance of focused activity at these different sites long enough for meaningful integration of disparate information and decisions to be made.

THE LEAP® MODEL OF LEARNING:

From a review of the major brain structures and the workings of learning and memory in the neurological literature, it is clear that both memory and learning do not involve a single, global hierarchical system in the brain. But rather, learning involves interplay between many inter-linked sub-systems or modules.22 Also, the timing and synchronisation of information flow between these sub-systems and modules appears to be critical to the success of learning and coherent cognitive function.

However, the sub-systems or modules underlying both learning and memory are both conscious and subconscious with most of the early leveling processing being totally subconscious, and only the highest levels of neural processing reaching consciousness. Yet, it is indeed these conscious modules that initiate and direct the processing to be done by the subconscious modules, as both learning and memory require “conscious” effort to occur. This means that the memory and learning processes can be disrupted at both the conscious and subconscious levels, depending upon which neural substrates or integrative pathways are disrupted.

Sensory processing of all types is initially a relatively linear chain of neural impulses originating from a generator potential of the sensory receptor, and following a chain of neurons into the Central Nervous System (CNS) and brain. However, this initially linear stream of nerve impulses, the data of the CNS, rapidly becomes divergent and multiplexed at higher levels of cortical processing.

Conscious perception only arises at the highest levels of these multiplexed data flows as they are reintegrated back into unified conscious perception by the cortical columns directing all conscious brain activity. Thinking and other cognitive abilities rely upon all of the proceeding levels of subconscious sensory processing, which are predominately bilateral initially, but which become progressively asymmetrical and lateralised with increasing levels of conscious awareness. Sensory information is processed initially as neural flows of increasing complexity that generate preverbal images and symbols, but becomes increasingly defined by language in higher level cognitive processes. And language by its very nature is based upon abstract representations of external reality (called words), that follow linear rules (grammar), and word order linked to meaning (syntax). Hence it is predominately sequential and linear in form, which permits analytical evaluation of the thoughts generated following rational rules of Logic. From the perspective of Logic, the world is interpreted as parts that can be constructed into a whole via deductive reasoning.

Sensory and other mental data not suitable for language-based rational processing is processed via visuo-spatial image and symbols that permit global, holistic comprehension of the whole and is inherently non-rational.23 This global, simultaneous, non-rational visuo-spatial processing has been termed Gestalt (German for pattern or form), with the meaning of the whole extracted via inductive reasoning. From the Gestalt perspective, the world is seen as a “whole” with intuitive understanding of the properties of the whole. There is no rational analysis of “Why?”, it just “Is”.

In the LEAP® Model of Learning, it is recognized that most of the lower level linear sensory processing occurs below conscious perception, that is either subcortical, being processed in the brainstem or other brain nuclei like the hypothalamus, thalamus, basal ganglia, etc., or is palaeocortical and limbic. Even the basal levels of cortical processing are largely bilateral and subconscious, and thus occur outside of conscious perception. All higher level cortical processing, which may become conscious, is thus reliant upon maintenance of integrated function and neural flows at these subconscious levels.

However, the more overtly cognitive components of learning rapidly become lateralised with processing dominated by activation of cortical columns, the functional units of the neocortex, in one hemisphere of the brain or the other. In right-handed people, Logic processing typically activates cortical columns in the left hemisphere, that then process the data in a linear analytical way, while activation of cortical columns in the right hemisphere process data in a Gestalt, visuo-spatial way.

Thus, at the highest levels of conscious neural processing underlying cognition and thought, whether that “thought” be verbally based language of Logic, or global intuitively based “knowing” of Gestalt, the neural processing is highly lateralised and is predominately processed in the right or left hemisphere.

The neural substrates for all “conscious” functions therefore are cortical columns of the neocortex (Fig. 1). Conscious activation of a cortical column acts to initiate a cascade of neural flows that rapidly spread to other cortical areas both conscious and subconscious in both hemispheres, and also into many subcortical structures as well. These consciously activated cortical columns initiate either Gestalt or Logic functions depending in which hemisphere they are located.

In LEAP® we term cortical columns activating Logic functions, Logic “lead” functions, and those activating Gestalt functions, Gestalt “lead” functions. These “lead” functions provide points of entry into an inter-linked set of cortical and subcortical modules that then perform our mental functions.

Figure 1. Cortical Columns. Vertical slabs of cortex consisting of all six distinct cell layers, called cortical columns, are the functional units of the cerebral cortex. Some of the cells like the large pyramidal cells have dendrites that extend through almost all layers and axons that exit the gray matter to become part of the white matter tracts carrying information to other parts of the brain and body. There are also innumerable interneurons connecting the cells within each cell layer and between the layers.

Indeed, it was a misunderstanding about the nature of these “lead” functions from which the popular “Right Brain – Left Brain” model of learning and brain function arose. Because damage to specific cortical columns caused loss of specific conscious functions, e.g. the ability to form an image, or figure out certain types of problems or solve certain types of puzzles, it was assumed that the damaged area actually did that specific function. In reality, all that cortical column did was provide a point of entry into these inter-linked sets of cortical and subcortical modules that actually performed the function lost because of the damage to the cortical “lead” function.

An analogy would be damage to the “K” key on your keyboard. Your consciousness is still intact and able to initiate “K” questions, and your computer system is still able to process and answer “K” questions, but the interface to initiate “K” processing in the computer has been damaged. Like wise, if a Gestalt “lead” function is damaged, the process initiated by this “lead” function no longer activates the inter-linked cortical and subcortical functions that are required for this process to occur. Thus, while damage to the area initiating a function, “blocks” the rest of the processing needed to perform the function, the area initiating function never actually ever “did” the function in the first place. To continue this analogy, in most cases it is not overt “damage” to the cortical “lead” function or subcortical brain areas that prevents effective thinking, but rather “blocked” access to these brain areas due to some stressor that is the problem. Thus, much in the same way a “sticky” key blocks fluent typing, “blocked access” to specific brain areas blocks effective thinking and problem-solving.

Synopsis of the LEAP® Model of Learning:

In summary, the LEAP® Model of Learning is based on the following suppositions about the nature and location of neural processing underlying learning and memory:

Sensory processing initiated by sensory receptors generates initially linear neural flows that rapidly diverge at each successive processing centre (spinal and cranial nerve ganglia, brainstem nuclei, subcortical nuclei, limbic cortices, and finally neocortical columns) into a number of different complex data streams. All processing below the neocortex is subconscious.

Each processing centre, at each successive level within the spinal cord, brainstem, diencephalon, basal forebrain and cortex elaborates the sensory data, defining some aspect more than another, or adds additional types of information needed to define the sensory data further at the next level of processing. All processing below the neocortex is subconscious.

At the higher cortical levels, input from many lower levels both cortical and subcortical is integrated to form a conscious perception of the initial sensory experience.

These higher cortical levels not only integrate processing of the “raw” sensory data, but also include integration of input from memory areas about past experiences with similar sensory stimuli.

At the highest cortical levels the conscious perceptions formed at lower cortical levels are further processed asymmetrically in either Gestalt or Logic cortical columns, and hence perceived as a visuos-patial pattern or a Gestalt, or abstractly as a verbal word based language or an abstract symbol based mathematical language.

The very highest levels of conscious processing that underlie our thinking about conscious perceptions, while dependent upon input from all areas of the brain, are generally frontal lobe and particularly involve working memory areas in the Dorsolateral Frontal Cortex.

A whole set of basal brainstem mechanisms maintain the organism in a state of homeostasis, such that higher level conscious sensory processing can proceed effectively:

These include the Reticular Activating System, the Periventricular Survival System, the Vestibular System and the Sensory-Motor System. Imbalances within or between these systems may disrupt on-going sensory processing and integration at this and higher levels. Processing at this level is totally subconscious.

The initial “raw” data stream is “sampled” by the Amygdala and other survival centres in the brainstem, and coloured by the survival emotions paired or associated with the sensory stimuli being analyzed, including the physiological responses to these emotions, and is the basis of Conditioned Learning. These primary survival emotions may disrupt on-going sensory processing and integration at this and higher levels. Processing at this level is subconscious.

When survival emotions of the Fight or Flight response are activated above some “threshold” value, the amygdala and other brainstem structures such as the Periaqueductal Grey Matter of the midbrain inhibit frontal cortical processing, interfering with reasoning and problem-solving. The cause of this loss of higher level conscious cortical processing is a direct consequence of activation of the subconscious primary survival emotions of the Limbic System and Brainstem.

Secondary processing of the sensory stimuli in the Brainstem, Limbic System and lower cortical levels generates a series of control functions defining the nature of the sensory data stream (e.g. control of pupils in vision) and second-order integration of this sensory data (e.g. movement, shape and location of object in space). Processing at this level is subconscious.

Further processing in the palaecortical components of the Limbic System (e.g. hippocampus, cingulate, subcallosal and orbitofrontal cortices) generates secondary emotions relative to the sensory data stream and primary emotions already supplied by the amygdala and other brainstem areas via sampling memory of related events. These secondary limbic emotions may disrupt on-going sensory processing and integration at this and higher levels. Processing at this level is largely subconscious.

Initial cortical processing is predominately bilateral and subconscious, and is dependent upon earlier processing at brainstem and subcortical levels. Emotions, either primary or secondary, may disrupt on-going sensory processing and integration at this and higher levels.

At some level of cortical processing the sensory data stream emerges into a conscious perception, and is dependent upon earlier processing at brainstem, subcortical, and earlier cortical levels. Emotions, either primary or secondary, may disrupt on-going integration at this and higher levels

At the highest levels of cortical processing, the processing is largely done in one hemisphere or the other and perceived consciously as a logical, rational thought or a visuospatial Gestalt, and is dependent upon earlier processing at brainstem, subcortical and cortical levels. Emotions, either primary or secondary, may disrupt on-going integration at this level, and any “thinking” dependent upon this level of processing.

Thinking about the fully processed and integrated sensory experience in the frontal lobes, based upon remembered sensory experiences relevant to the current experience may lead to decisions, which will be represented neurologically by activation of either Logic or Gestalt “lead” functions or both.

These “lead” functions will then initiate a cascade of neurological flow, which is initially frontal cortical, but rapidly flows into other cortical areas and subcortical structures like the basal ganglia, thalamus, and cerebellum, which in turn feedback to the cortex and each other. Emotions, either primary or secondary, may disrupt on-going processing and integration at any level of this process, and thus overtly affect the final outcome of the cognitive functions taking place.

Coherent neurological processing at any stage of the above process is dependent upon both uninterrupted flows along integrative pathways and within integrative processing centres. Disruption or de-synchronisation of the timing of these integrative neural flows or disruption or de-synchronisation of processing in any of the integrative centres may result in loss of cognitive function.

Maintaining integration along all integrative pathways and within all integrative centres produces optimum function, a state called Brain Integration in LEAP.

Loss of integrated brain function is the principal cause of dysfunction in both mental and physical performance, called Loss of Brain Integration in LEAP.

The primary mechanism causing Loss of Brain Integration is de-synchronisation and loss of timing of neural flows along integrative pathways and within integrative centres by inhibition or excitation of these pathways and centres by neural flows originating from brainstem and limbic survival related emotions.

On-going Loss of Brain Integration is often generated by early childhood trauma that creates long-term disruption of Brain Integration as a mechanism of coping.

Other factors affecting Brain Integration are genetic, structural, organic brain damage, and environmental stressors:

o Structural defects or abnormalities can be of developmental origin, e.g. neuronal migration problems, or result from toxin exposure at specific critical periods of development, e.g. fetal alcohol syndrome. Many cognitive defects have been shown to correlate with abnormalities in brain structure.24

o Organic Brain Damage may result from a head injury, and this damage often results in sclerosis that disrupts neural flows underlying Brain Integration (e.g. hippocampal sclerosis and subsequent epilepsy are often associated with learning disorders).

o Genetic Factors affecting Brain Integration are often genes that code for specific alleles for specific enzymes involved in maintaining normal levels of neurotransmitters or receptors in brain circuits.25 Deficiencies in either neurotransmitters or receptors will compromise Brain Integration, and have behavioural consequences. This is both the basis of much ADHD behaviour and the justification for drug use to ameliorate these behaviours.26

Other genes may code for alleles that affect fatty acid metabolism and utilisation, especially in maintaining neuronal membrane stability and function. This affects predominately physical co-ordination and reading.27

o Diet and nutritional deficiencies may also compromise brain function and result in loss of Brain Integration. Diets rich in fast or junk foods often create marginal nutritional deficiencies that may disrupt brain function, and often contain various preservatives and additives, like the azo-food dye tartrazine, that may cause a total loss of brain integration in sensitive individuals28.

Indeed, the misbehaviour and academic performance of children and young adults have been shown to improve significantly with diet change or nutritional supplementation29, and several recent books have discussed this aspect of behaviour and learning problems30.

o Environmental factors such as electromagnetic fields emitted from man-made electronic equipment and Geopathic stress from distortions in the earth’s electromagnetic fields may affect the brain integration of sensitive individuals and result in learning problems. 31

Loss of Brain Integration and Compensation

When Brain Integration is lost via disruption of the most efficient neural pathways and/or centres, either by organic damage or by functional inhibition of cortical or subcortical functions due to outputs from survival centres in the brain, specific conscious functions dependent upon this integration is also disrupted. The overt loss of conscious function is, however, often far less than the degree of interference with underlying functions might suggest because the brain is a master at compensation and will automatically compensate for these disrupted flows by using other areas of the brain, both conscious and subconscious to produce the most efficient processing possible.

Thus, even children with considerable organic brain damage will often establish compensatory neurological patterns of activity to produce varying levels of function in spite of massive disruption of neural pathways underlying normal function, e.g. children with cerebral palsy may learn to walk and talk. It is indeed this tremendous compensatory capacity of the brain that allows even highly disintegrated brains to produce some degree of function, however, the level of dysfunction controls the degree of compensation. Thus, the greater the degree of dysfunction present, the lesscompensation that is possible.

If the disruption of integrated function is at the more basal levels of integration, the ability to compensate for the resulting dysfunction is much more limited than if the loss of integration is at a higher level of processing because all higher levels of processing are dependent upon the quality of the data integrated at earlier levels of processing. For instance, while damage to an early component of vision, say the retina or optic nerve totally disrupts sight, damage and hence loss of integration in the V3 area of the occipital cortex may leave the image fully intact, but disrupt only colour vision.

When the highest levels of cortical integration are disrupted directly or lower level cortical or subcortical functions underlying these higher cortical functions are disrupted, we may lose the capacity to “think” in certain ways. For instance, we may maintain Gestalt creative abilities (e.g. be good at art and design), but lose the ability to perform even simple mathematics because of the loss of the ability to abstract (e.g. are hopeless at maths). Specific Learning Disorders result from the loss of integration in of higher-level cortical functions or lower-level subconscious cortical or subcortical functions supporting these higher-level functions directly activated by consciousness.

Children and adults suffering Specific Learning Disorders usually know what they need to do, often even how to do it (e.g. I want to spell this word, so I need to sequence the letters and remember this sequence). But they just cannot activate the necessary subcortical and cortical processing to do what they know how and want to do consciously because of loss of integration at some level of neural processing required to do this function. When this loss of Brain Integration affects their ability to read, spell, write or do mathematics, it results in SLDs. However, they will still attempt to perform these functions, but in some compensated way. For instance, a child that cannot spell words correctly (that is, visually in English), still attempts to spell words, but using phonetics to compensate for the “mind’s eye” image he/she cannot create.

Because the level at which the integration is disrupted is unknown to the consciousness and compensation is largely subconscious and automatic, a person with Specific Learning Disorders is only aware that some function is difficult or not possible to perform, but not why this is so. Most often Brain Integration is lost in subconscious functions that were never accessible to our consciousness in the first place.

Avoid these ingredients when you’re buying processed foods!

Thursday, November 26th, 2015

We know that processed foods aren’t optimal these days – but did you know they can be harming your health long term?  Here’s just a few ingredients that can cause long-term health issues…  such as immune issues, ADHD, behavioural issues, mitochondrial dysfunction and chronic fatigue.

3 tips for eating well:  1.  Eat organic  2.  Eat fresh  3.  Cut out sugar.

1 – Sodium Benzoate
Sodium benzoate is added to food to prevent the growth of pathogenic microbes, like fungi. A recent study published in 2015 revealed that sodium benzoate caused mutation and cytotoxicity through the formation of micronuclei and chromosome breaks – both characteristics found in cancer cells.  Another study in 2014 linked the intake of sodium benzoate-containing beverages to ADHD-like symptoms in college students.

2 – BHA (Butylated Hydroxyanisole)
BHA is used to prevent oils and fats from going rancid and is added to butters and chips. Similar to the results of the sodium benzoate study in 2015, a 2013 study revealed both cytotoxic and DNA fragmentation properties of BHA when used on human cells.  BHA also potentiates the harmful effects of propylparaben, a preservative found in most cosmetics.

3 – MSG (Monosodium glutamate)
Not only is MSG a preservative found in chips and other snacks, it is also used in cooking to enhance the flavor of certain dishes. While the FDA declares MSG as safe to consume, many others disagree and a recent study in 2013 revealed contraindicating results. The study revealed that MSG could cause kidney damage through the formation of kidney stones, along with increasing the levels of serum creatinine.

4 – Artificial Sweeteners
Although artificial sweeteners like aspartame are popular among diabetics and people watching their weight, a 2014 study revealed how people who regularly used AS experienced a sharp spike in glucose levels followed by a lengthy decline after consuming sugary food – a characteristic found in diabetes or other metabolic disorders. The study found out the AS altered the body’s gut bacteria, increasing the number of gut bacteria that fed on AS and have been linked with obesity.

5 – Potassium Bromate
Widely used in bread products, potassium bromate has been linked to tumor formation in the kidneys, abdomen, and thyroid, which is why it is banned in certain places like Canada and Europe.  A more recent study revealed that potassium bromate caused damage and oxidative stress in human red blood cells, causing the cells to lyse or break – which can contribute to numerous immunity disorders and cancers.

6 – High Fructose Corn Syrup
High fructose corn syrup found in most carbonated beverages has been linked to a variety of conditions like diabetes, liver disease, and obesity.  Not only is soda a source of empty calories, it can cause diseases as well.

7 – Artificial Coloring (blue 1, blue 2, yellow 5, and yellow 6)
There have been many studies on artificial food coloring and its effects on children, particularly their behavior. Studies in 2009 and 2012 reveal that AFC has effects on hyperactivity in children, as well as links to ADHD.

8 – Acrylamide
Acrylamide isn’t an “ingredient”, per se, but it can be found in certain food products (e.g. French fries, coffee, breakfast cereal) after going through high-heat processing. It also happens to be classified as a probable human carcinogen by the IARC, the International Agency for Research on Cancer. Two studies in 2011 focused on the carcinogenic effects of acrylamide, linking it to prostate cancer and cytotoxicity, a condition that causes cancer.

9 – Sodium Nitrite
Sodium nitrite is popularly used as a preservative in the food industry to prevent the growth of bacteria, prolonging the shelf life of the food product. While it is regarded as safe in small amounts, research has proven that SNT is not completely excreted by the body. About 60 percent remains circulating in the blood, forming nitrogen compounds that damage tissue and cause various diseases.

10 – BPA
It’s not exactly an ingredient… but it sure can end up in your food: Bisphenol A or BPA is used to line the inside of cans used to contain food. While certain canned goods that don’t use other preservatives on this list, the cans themselves can cause food to be contaminated with BPA. BPA is known as an EDC – or endocrine disrupting chemical. Intake of BPA in high doses can cause the body’s hormones to go haywire, which science has indicated can cause obesity and diabetes.  Note that the new “replacement” – BPS – which is sometimes found in products marked “BPA free” may also have problems. In short, you are better off with fresh foods if possible.

Anti-biotics in our food – Anti-biotics causing disease

Wednesday, August 5th, 2015

Anti-biotics are of huge importance to our health – and disease! Anti-biotics destroy our gut bacteria (as we know) but did you know that between 50 and 80% of anti-biotics in the Western world are in our foods:  pork, beef, chicken, farmed fish and other foods?  Not to mention in our GMO foods that contain anti-bioitics. Hugely linked to all kids health problems. Did you know that Genetically Modified Foods have the anti-biotics, pesticides and herbicides IN the SEEDS, so you CAN’T wash these toxins off!

We end up accidently destroying our immune system each time we eat food that contains anti-biotics.  Is our immune system keeping up with repair and maintenance?

Anti-Biotic use increases hardened, active, bacteria-laden biofilm in our body – and the combination of these are known to be linked to:

  •  cardiovascular disease: bacterial particles (linked to anti-biotic use) is found in the plaque in the arteries in heart disease
  • autism & Asperger’s:  staph & strep bacteria have been found in the basal ganglia of autistic children
  • dementia and Alzheimer’s:  it’s been known for many years that the plaque in the brain has heavy metals, xeno-oestrogens, and bacterial particles
  • diabetes:  the higher the levels of toxins stored in fat mass in the body, the more risk of diabetes.
  • ADHD & learning issues:  there is a huge gut-brain-learning connection.  The worse the gut, the harder it is to stay focussed and learn and concentrate.
  • behavioural problems:  similar issues to ADHD & Learning – behaviour problems, the brain, the gut – all linked
  • chronic fatigue & fibromyalgia: 100% of people with chronic fatigue & fibromyalgia have gut issues, small intestinal bacterial overgrowth & gut issues
  • mitochondrial dysfunction – inability to think, inability to access cellular energy – bacterial particles ‘clog up’ our mechanisms inside our cells and hinder our health
  • and so much more…

LEAP, Learning & Behavioural Issues, ADHD & Dyslexia

Tuesday, July 28th, 2015

LEAP Brain Integration at New Leaf Natural TherapiesNew Leaf Natural Therapies LEAPThere is a process called LEAP that is a step by step process of working through neurological issues in the brain – giving an individual access to their full potential and ability.  Madonna has been doing LEAP for around 15 years – and it’s an ongoing learning process for practitioners – since they keep finding out new stuff about the brain!  We use LEAP and other kinesiology processes for:

  • Dyslexia and Nervous system disorders
  • Stage fright, fear of exams, fear of teachers
  • Dislike of learning, dislike of teachers
  • Supporting better learning outcomes
  • Stress and behavioural issues

 

Learning Enhancement Acupressure Program (LEAP), was developed by Dr Charles T. Krebs in collaboration with clinical psychologists, speech pathologists, neurologists and other health professionals. LEAP is a comprehensive approach to assessing and correcting most learning challenges including dyslexia, ADD, ADHD, and many difficulties with reading, spelling and mathematics.

Neurological conditions involving imbalances in brain function and can affect learning. LEAP addresses these imbalances by re-establishing and maintaining the precise synchrony of the brain.

LEAP  is a program that enhances brain function, learning and all areas of performance. The foundation of all high level performance and learning is integrated brain function because the brain is a multi-modular structure “bound” together functionally by synchronised timing of neural activity. Performance of any mental activity can be considered the “symphony of thought”. The output of each brain module must be precisely “timed” to prevent the harmony of mental function from turning into a dysfunctional state. Loss of integrated brain function literally equals loss of effective emotional and mental processing, the primary source of “stress” in our lives.

The purpose of LEAP Brain Integration is to re-establish brain integration during times of stress.  Sometimes it was never properly established in the first place. The loss of Brain Integration and thus function may only be situational, causing difficulty and stress performing certain functions in certain situations or circumstances (ex. stage fright) or it may be on-going as in the case of Specific Learning Difficulties.

Far too many of us, adults and children alike, experience cognitive deficiencies that are a direct result of the loss of proper brain integration.
LEAP techniques have helped tens of thousands of individuals to overcome these challenges.

What else do we need to do?  The usual suspects!

  • Check for food intolerances upsetting brain integration
  • Check for old stress patterns/survival patterns shutting down brain integration
  • Check for toxicity issues – vaccine toxins, heavy metals, pesticides, herbicides etc
  • Check for nutritional deficiencies – there are ALWAYS nutritional needs for kids with learning and behavioural issues.  Always!
  • Reduce the inflammation in the brain, increase the nutrition in the food!

Best testing processes for kids at New Leaf!

  • OligoScan for those kids 13 years and older.  Checks for heavy metals, mineral levels, and how the body’s being affected.  Love it!
  • Looking at your blood on a TV screen – 1 drop of blood – easy to find gut, liver, immune challenges.
  • Food Detective – tests 50 core intolerances within 60 minutes!

Learning Enhancement Programme:

  • $210.00 per month – 9 month plan.
  • Includes 45 minute kinesiology and 60 minute Microcurrent
  • Saves 40% off additional treatments for the child
  • Saves 30% off additional treatments for the family!

Better Balance Plan with Georgia

  • $108.50 per month – 9 month plan.  LIMITED OFFER!!!!  GET IN QUICKLY 🙂
  • Includes 1 hour kinesiology with Georgia
  • Saves 30% off additional treatments for the child
  • Saves 30% off additional treatments for the family!

Foundations of Health with Madonna

  • $151.20 per month for 9 months
  • Includes 1 x 45 minute kinesiology/naturopathic appt
  • Save 40% off additional treatments for the child
  • Saves 30% off additional treatments for the family!

Massage Plan for relaxation with Reenee-Jee or Carole

  • $80.50 per month for 9 months
  • Includes 1 x 60 minute massage
  • Saves 30% off additional treatments for the child
  • Saves 30% off additional treatments for the family!

Call us on 3348 6098 to chat out treatments, plans and how we can help you!!

 

Biofilm, Infections & Chronic health problems

Tuesday, July 28th, 2015

   Ew!!  Let’s talk yucky mucus!   This is a fungal ball – the result of anti-bitoics which allow fungus to grow, and then the body releases mucus to sop up the fungus.  Yuck!

Research is showing that biofilm (a mucus substance that is released to ‘sop up’ bacterial, fungal and viral particles) in the average person – with a normal history of vaccines and anti-biotic use, is holding up to 20 chronic infections in our bodies.  Why?

  • Anti-biotic use:  one dose of anti-biotics can destroy our gut lining, and our bacterial, viral and fungal combination in our gut for up to 7 years IF we haven’t done anything to repair the dose.  Because anti-biotics upset our gut lining, our body makes biofilm to help to soothe it, often containing the bug-particles that we’ve been killing off.  Anti-biotics are anti-bacterial – but they may allow candida, fungus, viruses or cancer cells to get out of hand…
  • Pain killers – yep!  Any medical pain killers are anti-inflammatory by nature (makes sense!) but did you know that the process of killing bad bacteria or viruses or fungus or candida or cancer cells is indeed inflammatory?  In other words, the more pain killers we take, the more chronic infections we can have lurking in our systems.  If you take pain-killers you must be on probiotics to balance your body

 

  • Vaccines – the ‘adjuvants’ in vaccines – the mercury and aluminium – are highly toxic to the gut lining and to our immune cells.  These heavy metals not only make our bodies need to make more biofilm, but they destroy good gut bacteria and good gut viruses and can turn them into nasty disease forming bugs.
  • We have 24,000 genes which will last our lifetime.  We have between 1000-2500 different types of bacteria, viruses, candida, fungal ‘bugs’ living in our bodies all the time (making up trillions of cells – this is our microbiome) – Bugs have a short shelf life – and as THEY replicate, THEY are learning how to live in OUR bodies.  If we’re stressed – they’re learning to live in a stressful environment.  If we’re toxic – they’re learning how to live in a toxic environment.

Where does the biofilm live in our bodies?

  • in our lungs (asthma), throat, sinuses (allergies), brain (it’s linked with dementia, autism, aspergers), heart (it’s linked with heart disease), abdominal cavity (linked to menstrual issues, gut issues and fertility issues), intestines (constipation, IBS, Crohns, diarrhoea), skin (acne, psoriasis, chronic skin issues)

What can we do about biofilm?

  • Kinesiology and Microcurrent helps your body to activate biofilm so that the immune system can recognise it and start dealing with it.
  • There are herbs, supplements and essential oils which help to break down biofilm and release old infections (so that we can deal with them) – favourite supplements at New Leaf are Bactrex, Parex, NasoClear, Herbal Throat Spray and N-acetyl cysteine.
  • Boost the immune system, tone the organs that have been damaged (lungs, gut, brain, throat, intestines), deal with the infections as they are released from deep inside and improve the way the body copes with stress.
  • Chi Nei Tsang and Reflexology can support the body in breaking down biofilm and boosting the immunity.

We can help.  Biofilm is linked to all chronic disease – not to mention kids health.

Ask about our OligoScan, Looking at your blood in real time… and Kinesiology testing.

3348 6098

Understanding Chronic Infections

Friday, June 28th, 2013

Medical research is currently in the process of reframing the way we view infections, with the knowledge that most organisms in nature, including those in and on our bodies, for complex colonies known as biofilms.

These are communities of microbes that work collaboratively and live adhered to a surface, be it a rock at the bottom of a creek, the mucosa of our gut, or the surface of a tooth.

As a biofilm colony grows, it secretes and surrounds itself with an extracellular matrix substance to provide protection and stability.  This protective matrix gives the microbes within that community resistance to immune attack and antibiotics.  Additionally, when the biofilm community is attacked, it retains the ability to regrow from a few ‘persistor’ cells (a special form of the bacteria likened to a dormant seed), ready to regrow when the environment becomes favourable.  Alarmingly, 80% of infections are comprised of bacteria living in the biofilm phenotype, which makes them hidden, resistant and persistent.

It is important to note, however, that not all biofilms are detrimental.  The biofilm is the natural state for bacteria in the body, which means the normal commensal flora of the skin and mucous membranes also exist in a biofilm.  Our therapeutic approach, therefore, must not be focussed on eradicating all biofilms, but rather on ensuring the right balance of flora exists for optimal health.

  • We find that chronic biofilm imbalances, however, are found in:
    chronic fatigue syndrome
  • fibromyalgia
  • autism, ASD, aspergers, ADHD, ODD, behavioural problems
  • sinus and hayfever
  • asthma and respiratory problems such as URTI, chronic allergies
  • chronic bronchitis

On average, in current studies in the U.S., there are around 5-8 hidden infections lying latent in the body with ANY chronic health issue, including so many of our cancers, autism, mood and behavioural problems.  Both interesting and scary!

Let’s find it, treat it, and get you better!

Madonna Guy ND
New Leaf Natural Therapies

3348 6098

Adrenal Fatigue/Chronic Fatigue – Natural Support at New Leaf

Friday, June 14th, 2013

Adrenal Fatigue is such a huge problem in society these days, each person’s history is totally different, and the ability to prescribe a one-off bottle of Adrenotone and fixing it is just about over.

Signs that you may have adrenal fatigue!

1. increased caffeine intake
2. increased snacking to control blood sugar fluctuations
3. increased fatigue
4. increased irritability
5. increased sleep problems If you feel “wired but tired” you likely need some adrenal support.
6. development of any long-term disease
7. ADD, ADHD, inability to think clearly
Some of our favourite supplements and protocols for Adrenal Fatigue are:
1.  Kinesiology for Immune & Endocrine balancing, stress, dealing with traumas
2.  Frequency Specific Microcurrent:  helps to remove toxins caused by inflammation
3.  Remedial Massage, Hot Stone Massage, Relaxing Massage & Infrared Saunas:  increases serotonin levels, reduces inflammatory hormones and helps us to heal
4.  Supplements:
*  Adrenotone – combination of nutrients which help thyroid and adrenal fatigue
*  Ultra Flora Immune, Andro NK, Bactrex, Parex, Costat, Waiora NCD – for those who have a history with infections preceding fatigue
*  Gaba, Proxan, Resilian, Stressan, Relaxan, Estrofactors, Oestroclear – for those with a history of stress/depression/anxiety/hormonal imbalances
*  Resist X, Chromium Plus, MetaPure EPA/DHA, Mitochondrial Complex – balances blood sugar and increases Mitochondrial Function…
*  Lipoic Acid, Glutathione, NCD, Oxidant Protection, non-acidic Vitamin C
We also see signs of exhaustion in a number of our clinical tests including Live Blood Screenings and Bio-impedance Analysis Screenings.
Call us to book an appointment (phone appointments or in-clinic appointments) on 3348 6098
Madonna Guy
Chief Clinician
New Leaf Natural Therapies
3348 6098
healthteam@newleafnaturaltherapies.com.au

LEAP Assessment: What do we do?

Friday, June 7th, 2013

LEAP Assessment

LEAP (Learning Enhancement Acupressure Programme) is a process based on core neurology of the brain.  We use a muscle monitoring process which has been used on tens of thousands of people to find which areas of the brain are functioning, and which aren’t.  We initially do an assessment on your or your family member and find where the deficits are:

  • where is the logic in the brain?
  • where is the gestalt/visual-spatial part of the brain?
  • what is the dominant hand? eye?
  • how much function is there in some connecting pathways?
  • are the visual memory areas of the brain functioning?
  • how is comprehension?
  • how is problem solving?

Our process has been developed by Dr Charles Krebs over the past 28 years.  Charles is a researcher who’s life has been working towards helping people reach their potential, finding the ways of testing and correcting neurology imbalances that stress us when we are trying to do something new.  Charles’ book ‘A Revolutionary Way of Thinking’ was released over 10 years ago and really gives a great understanding of the brain, its potential, what shuts down its potential – it’s a great read!

What stresses you in life?

  • bookwork
  • paperwork
  • your kids homework
  • helping your child to do their maths or spelling
  • feeling like your child just isn’t remembering properly? (It feels sometimes like they’re just not trying!?)
  • stress in exams
  • stress in meetings
  • stress in front of a room full of people
  • avoidance of anything new
  • anxiety? depression? panic attacks? behavioural changes at school/work compared to at home?
  • memory – walking into one room and not being able to remember properly

These are the type of issues that the LEAP Programme helps to correct.  It is aimed at helping people reach their potential – the potential of their individual brain!  Not everyone is an Einstein (not that we’d want to be) but we can always find ways of improving the way our brain works.

Call us to book an assessment today!

3348 6098
Madonna Guy ND
New Leaf Natural Therapies

LEAP Practitioners, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia!

 

Health issues and don’t know why? Is it leaky gut?!

Thursday, June 6th, 2013

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