Archive for the ‘fibromyalgia’ Category

Let’s chat MTHFR

Wednesday, April 10th, 2019

What is MTHFR?

You may have seen the abbreviation “MTHFR” pop up in recent health news. It might look like a curse word at first glance, but it actually has to do with a relatively common genetic mutation.

MTHFR stands for methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase. It’s getting attention due to a genetic mutation that may lead to high levels of homocysteine in the blood and low levels of folate and other vitamins.

There’s been concern that certain health issues are associated with MTHFR mutations, so testing has become more mainstream over the years.

Variants of the MTHFR mutation

People can have either one or two mutations (or neither) on the MTHFR gene. These mutations are often called variants. A variant is a part of the DNA of a gene that is commonly different (or varies) from person to person.

Having one variant (heterozygous) is unlikely to contribute to health issues. Some people believe having two mutations (homozygous) may lead to more serious problems. There are two variants (forms) of mutations that can occur on the MTHFR gene.

Specific variants are:

  • C677T. Guestimates of up to 30% p of the Australian population may have a mutation at gene position C677T. About 10-15% of Caucasian people have this mutation.
  • A1298C. Around 20% of the Australian population may have a homozygous mutation at gene position A1298C.
  • It’s also possible to acquire both C677T and A1298C mutations (one copy of each).

Gene mutations are inherited, which means you acquire them from your parents. At conception, you receive one copy of the MTHFR gene from each parent. If both have mutations, your risk is higher of having a homozygous mutation.

Symptoms of a MTHFR mutation

Symptoms vary from person to person and from variant to variant. If you do a quick internet search, you’ll likely find many websites claiming MTHFR directly causes a number of conditions.

Keep in mind that research around MTHFR and its effects is still evolving. Evidence linking most of these health conditions to MTHFR  is currently lacking or has been disproven and should be taken with a grain of salt.

More than likely, unless you have problems or have testing done, you’ll never become aware of your MTHFR mutation status.

Conditions that have been proposed to be associated with MTHFR include:

  • cardiovascular and thromboembolic diseases (specifically blood clots, stroke, embolism, and heart attacks)
  • depression
  • anxiety
  • bipolar disorder
  • schizophrenia
  • colon cancer
  • acute leukaemia
  • chronic pain and fatigue
  • nerve pain
  • migraines
  • recurrent miscarriages in women of child-bearing age
  • pregnancies with neural tube defects, like spina bifida and anencephaly

The risk is possibly increased if a person has two gene variants or is homozygous for the MTHFR mutation.

Some at-home genetic testing kits offer screening for MTHFR as well.

  • 23andMe is a popular choice that provides genetic ancestry and health information. It’s also relatively inexpensive (up to $260). To perform this test, you deposit saliva into a tube and send it via mail to a lab. Results take six to eight weeks.
  • My Home MTHFR (up to $225) is another option that specifically focuses on the mutation. The test is performed by collecting DNA from the inside of your cheek with swabs. After shipping the specimen, results take one to two weeks.

Treatment for related health concerns

Having an MTHFR variant doesn’t mean you need medical treatment, it could just mean you need to take a supplemental vitamin B. Treatment may be indicated when a person has very high homocysteine levels, almost always above the level attributed to most MTHFR variants. Doctors should rule out other possible causes of increased homocysteine, which can occur with or without MTHFR variants.

Other causes of high homocysteine include:

  • hypothyroidism
  • conditions like diabetes, high cholesterol, and high blood pressure
  • obesity and inactivity
  • certain medications, such as atorvastatin, fenofibrate, methotrexate, and nicotinic acid

From there, the treatment will depend on the cause and doesn’t necessarily take into account MTHFR. The exception is when you have all of the following together:

  • high homocysteine levels
  • a confirmed MTHFR mutation
  • vitamin deficiencies in folate, choline, or vitamins B-12, B-6, or riboflavin

In these cases, doctors may suggest supplementation to address deficiencies along with medications or treatments to address the specific health condition.

People with MTHFR mutations may also wish to take preventative measures by changing certain lifestyle choices that can elevate homocysteine levels. Things like stopping smoking, getting enough exercise, and eating a healthy, balanced diet may help without the use of medications.

Complications in pregnancy

Recurrent miscarriages and neural tube defects are potentially associated with MTHFR. The Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center says studies suggest that women who have two C677T variants are at an increased risk of having a child with a neural tube defect.

A 2006 study looked at women with a history of recurrent miscarriages. It found that 59 percent of them had multiple homozygous gene mutations, including MTHFR, associated with blood clotting, versus only 10 percent of women in the control category.

Speak with your naturopath or doctor about testing if you’ve experienced several unexplained miscarriages, have had a child with a neural tube defect, or if you know you have the MTHFR mutation and become pregnant.

Though there is little evidence to support it, some doctors suggest blood clotting medications. Extra folate supplementation may also be recommended.powered by Rubicon Project

Potential supplementation

The MTHFR gene mutation inhibits the way the body processes folic acid and other important B vitamins. Changing up supplementation of this nutrient is a potential focus in countering its effects.

Folic acid is actually a man-made version of folate, a naturally occurring nutrient found in foods. Taking the bioavailable form of folate — methylated folate — may help your body absorb it more readily.

Most people are encouraged to take a multivitamin that contains at least 0.4 milligrams of folate or folic acid each day. Pregnant women are not encouraged to switch prenatal vitamins or care based on their MTHFR status alone. This means taking the standard dose of 0.6 milligrams of folate daily.

Women with a history of neural tube defects should speak with their doctor for specific recommendations.

Diet considerations

Eating foods rich in folate may help naturally support your levels of this important vitamin. Supplementation may still be necessary, however.

Good food choices include:

  • proteins like cooked beans, peas, and lentils
  • veggies like spinach, asparagus, lettuce, beets, broccoli, corn, Brussels sprouts, and bok choy
  • fruits like cantaloupe, honeydew, banana, raspberries, grapefruit, and strawberries
  • juices like orange, canned pineapple, grapefruit, tomato, or other vegetable juice
  • peanut butter
  • sunflower seeds

People with MTHFR mutations may want to avoid foods that contain the synthetic form of folate, folic acid — though the evidence is not clear that is necessary or beneficial. Be sure to check labels, as this vitamin is added to many enriched grains, like pasta, cereals, breads, and commercially produced flours.

The takeaway

Your MTHFR status may or may not be impacting your health. More research is needed to assess the true implications, if any, associated with the variants.

Again, many respected health organizations don’t recommend testing for this mutation, especially without other medical indications. Speak with your doctor about the benefits and risks of testing, as well as any other concerns you may have.

Continue to eat well, exercise, and practice other healthy lifestyle habits to support your overall well-being.

 9 sources

Mast Cell Activation Syndrome!

Friday, June 15th, 2018

 

Does histamine control your life?   Are you even aware that it might?  You might have MCAS!!

Much of this information comes from Dr Tania Dempsey and Dr Jill Carnahan in the States….  but it is a Syndrome worth thinking about if you’re simply not getting on top of your pain, allergies, nervous system stresses etc….  Many doctors in Australia are totally unaware of this condition.

What is Mast Cell Activation Syndrome?

Mast cells, a type of blood cell, play an important role in the body’s immune system. They reside in all body tissues and form part of the body’s initial defence system. Mast cells react to foreign bodies and injury by releasing a variety of potent chemical mediators, such as histamine, when activated. In a healthy person these chemicals will act beneficially to protect and heal the body, but in a person with MCAS these same chemicals are inappropriately triggered and released and have a negative effect on the body. Amongst the triggers are a variety of different foods, exercise, chemicals, fragrances and stress. Many sufferers struggle to identify their triggers and continue to discover new triggers for many years after diagnosis.

MCAS forms part of a spectrum of mast cell disorders involving proliferation and/or excessive sensitivity of mast cells, it has been identified since 2007. It features inappropriate mast cell activation with little or no increase in the number of mast cells, unlike in Mastocytosis*.  MCAS causes a wide range of unpleasant, sometimes debilitating, symptoms in any of the different systems of the body, frequently affecting several systems at the same time. The onset of MCAS is often sudden, affecting both children and adults, sometimes in family groups, mimicking many other conditions and presenting a wide-range of different symptoms that can be baffling for both the patient and their physician. Often there are no obvious clinical signs since MCAS confounds the anatomy-based structure underpinning the traditional diagnostic approach. Very often Mast Cell Activation Syndrome is hiding in plain sight.

Mastocystosis:  very rare and NOT what we’re talking about here…

Mastocytosis involves inappropriate mast cell activation AS WELL AS an increased number of mast cells. It is a rare but relatively well known mast cell disorder and is currently easier to diagnose than MCAS.

Mast Cell Activation Syndrome (MCAS): When Histamine Goes Haywire…

Mast cells are present in most tissues throughout the human body, especially connective tissue, skin, intestinal lining cardiovascular system, nervous system, and reproductive organs. They are part of the allergic response designed to protect us from threat and injury.  When the body is exposed to a perceived threat, the mast cells secrete chemical mediators, such as histamine, interleukins, prostaglandins, cytokines, chemokine and various other chemicals stored in the cytoplasm of the cell.  These chemical messengers produce both local and systemic effects, such as increased permeability of blood vessels (inflammation and swelling), contraction of smooth muscle (stomach cramps and heart palpitations), and increase mucous production (congestion, sneezing, etc).   Historically, we thought of mast cells only in relation to an allergic or anaphylactic response.  We now know they play a profound role in immune activation, development of autoimmunity and many other disorders, such as POTS (postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome).  Sadly we are seeing a large increase in patients presenting with mast cell disorders and MCAS.  I believe it is in part do to the onslaught of more pervasive environmental toxins, moulds and chemicals.

Withouts mast cells, we would not be able to heal from a wound.  They protect us from injury and help the body to heal.  Unfortunately, overactive mast cells can cause a variety of serious symptoms.

Symptoms of overactive mast cells may include:

  • skin rashes/hives
  • swelling/oedema
  • flushing
  • asthma
  • itching
  • abdominal pain
  • nausea/vomiting
  • diarrhoea
  • wheezing
  • shortness of breath
  • heart palpitations
  • anxiety, difficulty concentrating
  • headaches
  • brain fog
  • low blood pressure
  • fatigue

Mast cell activation syndrome (MCAS) is a condition symptoms involving the skin, gastrointestinal, cardiovascular, respiratory, and neurologic systems. It can be classified into primary (clonal proliferation or mastocytosis), secondary (due to a specific stimulus), and idiopathic (no identifiable cause). Proposed criteria for the diagnosis of MCAS included episodic symptoms consistent with mast cell mediator release affecting two or more organ systems with hives, swelling, flushing, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, abdominal pain, low blood pressure, fainting, heart palpitations, wheezing, red eyes, itching, and/or nasal congestion.  For a diagram of all of the varied symptoms histamine can cause, click here.

Triggers may be medications, foods, supplements, hormones, opioids, stressors (physical or emotional), cold temperature, heat, pressure, noxious odors, chemicals, insect bites, trauma or environmental toxins.

We commonly see mast cell activation syndromes associated with CIRS (chronic inflammatory response syndrome) in response to biotoxins, such as mould, inflammagens, and lyme-related toxins.

Low MSH and Mast Cell Disorders?

As mentioned above, we frequently see histamine intolerance and MCAS in patients with mold-related CIRS (chronic inflammatory response syndrome).  It is interesting to note that a common finding in CIRS is low MSH.  According to this study in the Journal of Investigative Dermatology, alpha-MSH plays an immunomodulatory role during inflammatory and allergic reactions of the skin.  In addition, there is evidence that MSH induces mast-cell apoptosis(cell death).

Definition of Mast Cell Activation Syndrome (MCAS)

  1. Typical clinical symptoms as listed above
  2. Increase in serum tryptase level or an increase in other mast cell derived mediators, such as histamine or prostaglandins (PGD2), or their urinary metabolites,
  3. Response of symptoms to treatment
Mast Cell Activation Syndrome (MCAS)

Mast cells can be activated by both direct and indirect mechanisms as a result of exposure of the host to pathogens.

Diseases Associated with Mast Cell Activation Syndrome (MCAS)

  • Allergies and Asthma
  • Autism
  • Autoimmune diseases (Hashimoto’s thyroiditis,  systemic lupus, multiple sclerosis, bullous pemphigoid, rheumatoid arthritis and others.Eczema
  • Celiac Disease
  • Chronic Fatigue Syndrome
  • CIRS (chronic inflammatory response syndrome)
  • Eosinophilic Esophagitis
  • Fibromyalgia
  • Food Allergy and Intolerances
  • Gastroesophageal reflux (GERD)
  • Infertility (mast cells in endometrium may contribute to endometriosis)
  • Interstitial Cystitis
  • Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS)
  • Migraine Headaches
  • Mood disorders – anxiety, depression, and insomnia
  • Multiple Chemical Sensitivities
  • POTS (postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome)
Mast cells are known to be the primary responders in allergic reactions, orchestrating strong responses to minute amounts of allergens. Several recent observations indicate that they may also have a key role in coordinating the early phases of autoimmune diseases, particularly those involving auto-antibodies.

Mast cells are known to be the primary responders in allergic reactions, orchestrating strong responses to minute amounts of allergens. Several recent observations indicate that they may also have a key role in coordinating the early phases of autoimmune diseases, particularly those involving auto-antibodies.

Lab Tests for Mast Cell Activation Syndrome (MCAS) – many of these are as yet unavailable in Australia …  Possibly histamine is as yet the only available, but chat to Georgia about what our Naturopathic Labs can offer….

  • Lab tests specific to mast cell activation for suspected MCAS may include:
    • Serum tryptase (most famous mast cell mediator)
    • Serum chromogranin A
    • Plasma histamine
    • Plasma PGD2 (chilled)
    • Plasma heparin (chilled)
    • Urine for PGD2 (chilled)
    • PGF2a
    • N-methylhistamine
  • Tryptase is the most famous mast cell mediator. Serum tryptase value is usually normal in MCAS patients, but sometimes it is elevated.  Tryptase values that show an increase of 20% + 2 ng/ml above the baseline level are considered diagnostic for MCAS.
  • Chromogranin A is a heat-stable mast cell mediator.  High levels can suggest MCAS, but other sources must first be ruled out, such as heart failure, renal insufficiency, neuroendocrine tumors and proton pump inhibitor (PPI) use.
  • Heparin is a very sensitive and specific marker of mast cell activation.  However, due to its quick metabolism in the body, it is very difficult to measure reliably.
  • N-methylhistamine is usually measured in a 24 hour urine test to account for the variability in release over the course of the day.
  • Prostaglandin D2 is produced by several other cell types, but mast cell release is responsible for the dominant amount found in the body.  PGD2 is less stable than histamine and metabolized completely in 30 minutes.
  • Other less specific mast cell mediators that are sometimes abnormal in MCAS patients include Factor VIII, plasma free norepinephrine, tumor necrosis factor alpha, and interleukin-6.

Treatments to reduce MCAS symptoms and lower histamine

  • H1 Blockers
    1. hydroxyzine, doxepine, diphenhydramine, cetirizine, loratadine, fexofenadine
  • H2 Blockers
    1. Famotidine (Pepcid, Pepcid AC)
    2. Cimetidine (Tagamet, Tagamet HB)
    3. Ranitidine (Zantac)
  • Leukotriene inhibitors
    1. Montelukast (Singulair)
    2. Zafirlukast (Accolate)
  • Mast cell stabilizers –
    1. Cromolyn
    2. Ketotifen
    3. Hyroxyurea
  • Tyrosine kinase inhibitors – imatinib
  • Natural anti-histamines and mast-cell stabilizers
    • Ascorbic Acid
    • Quercetin
    • Vitamin B6 (pyridoxal-5-phosphate)
    • Omega-3 fatty acids (fish oil, krill oil)
    • Alpha Lipoic Acid
    • N-acetylcysteine (NAC)
    • Methylation donors (SAMe, B12, methyl-folate, riboflavin)
  • Certain probiotics decrease histamine production
    • Lactobacillus rhamnosus and bifidobacter species 
  • DAO Enzymes with meals – UmbrelluxDAO
  • Decrease consumption of high histamine foods (more on histamine-restricted diet)
    • Avoid alcoholic beverages
    • Avoid raw and cured sausage products such as salami.
    • Avoid processed or smoked fish products. Use freshly caught seafood instead.
    • Avoid pickles
    • Avoid citrus fruits.
    • Avoid chocolate
    • Avoid nuts
    • Avoid products made with yeast and yeast extracts
    • Avoid soy sauce and fermented soy products
    • Avoid black tea and instant coffee
    • Avoid aged cheese
    • Avoid spinach in large quantities
    • Avoid tomatoes, ketchup and tomato sauces
    • Avoid artificial food colorings & preservatives
    • Avoid certain spices: cinnamon, chili powder, cloves, anise, nutmeg, curry powder, cayenne pepper

References

  1. Mast Cell Activation Syndrome, A Review
  2. Mast cell activation disease: a concise practical guide for diagnostic workup and therapeutic options
  3. Presentation, Diagnosis and Management of Mast Cell Activation Syndrome by Dr. Afrin
  4. Histamine and Gut Immune Mucosal Regulation
  5. Dr. Theoharides presents “Mast Cell Disorders”
  6. Diagram of Histamine Symptoms
  7. Mast Cell Aware
  8. A Tale of Two Syndromes
  9. Mold Histamine Connection

Remedial Massage; Reflexology; Chi Nei Tsang; Aromatherapy; Deep Tissue; Sports Massage – at New Leaf :-)

Tuesday, March 8th, 2016

Are you aware of the types of massage we do, the benefits and why we keep offering it for your health problems?

Massage is perhaps one of the oldest healing traditions. Many cultures – including the Ancient Greeks, Egyptians, Chinese and Indians – were convinced of the therapeutic properties of massage and used it to treat a variety of ailments.

Massage is the application of manual techniques to the soft tissue to mobilise them to maintain flexibility. Massage is especially effective in breaking compensatory pain postures and patterns. For example, a tension headache is often self-sustaining because the pain makes the person clench the affected muscles even harder, which, in turn, creates more pain. A thorough neck and shoulder massage can reduce muscle tension and break the pain cycle.

Massage for treatment of some disorders

Modern studies have shown that massage can be used to successfully treat a variety of disorders, including:

  • anxiety
  • arthritis
  • back or neck pain
  • soft tissue injuries
  • chronic pain
  • constipation
  • depression
  • headache
  • high blood pressure
  • insomnia.

Benefits of massage

One of the immediate benefits of massage is a feeling of deep relaxation and calm. This occurs because massage prompts the release of endorphins, the brain chemicals (neurotransmitters) that produce feelings of wellbeing. Levels of stress hormones, such as adrenalin, cortisol and norepinephrine, are also reduced. Studies indicate that high levels of stress hormones impair the immune system.

Some of the physical benefits of massage include:

  • reduced muscle tension
  • improved circulation
  • stimulation of the lymphatic system
  • reduction of stress hormones
  • increased joint mobility and flexibility
  • improved skin tone
  • speedier healing of soft tissue injuries
  • heightened mental alertness
  • reduced anxiety and depression.

Different types of massage

Typically, the massage practitioner uses either oil or talcum powder to allow their hands to slip over the person’s skin. Sometimes, a sheet or thin piece of cloth might be used for the same effect.

The different types of massage may include:

  • Aromatherapy – essential oils made from selected flowers and plants are added to the massage oil for their particular therapeutic properties. For example, the scent of sandalwood is thought to reduce nervous tension.
  • Baby massage – can help to treat constipation, colic and sleeping problems. Studies have found that regular massage helps premature babies to gain weight at a faster rate.
  • Reflexology – massage of the feet can encourage healing in other parts of the body.
  • Therapeutic – also known as ‘Western’ or ‘Swedish’ massage. One of the most popular forms of massage in Australia, this technique is designed to promote relaxation and improve blood circulation.
  • Remedial – encourages healing of injured soft tissue, such as muscles, tendons and ligaments.
  • Hot Stone Massage – is a relaxing technique that uses the heat from the stones to penetrate into the muscle tissues
  • Sports – is a blend of techniques that aim to enhance performance and help overworked muscles to recover quickly.
  • Chi Nei Tsang – an abdominal massage process (45-60 minutes on the abdomen) which improves circulation to the abdominal organs, intestines, reproductive organs, muscles and tendons inside the pelvic cavity and lower back.

Special considerations

There are some instances where massage isn’t recommended, including:

  • during pregnancy, especially the first trimester
  • if skin rashes, cuts or infections are present
  • if fractures or broken bones are suspected.

Call us on 3348 6098 to see if we can help you!

Madonna Guy ND Naturopath / Kinesiologist

Remedial massage at New Leaf Natural Therapies!

Tuesday, March 8th, 2016

 

Looking for a great remedial massage clinic?   Our bright, bubbly, caring new pracci will support you in getting well – with her amazing skills of remedial massage.  We have experience is supporting you deal with:

  • neck pain, jaw pain
  • spinal cord and disc pain
  • shoulders and hips
  • lymphatic congestion – swelling and inflammation
  • for headaches, migraines, chronic head, neck, jaw pain
  • arthritis, rheumatoid arthritis
  • abdominal massage – for pain and inflammation in your digestive organs, reproductive organs and hip flexors
  • fibromyalgia and chronic fatigue syndrome
  • hip realignment
  • feet, ankle, leg aches and pains

Our Remedial Massage payment plan is from only $80.50 / month (saves 30%) and if you’re on a payment plan you also save 10-30% on all other treatments and testing processes at New Leaf.

Madonna Guy ND
New Leaf Natural Therapies
3348 6098

Anti-biotics in our food – Anti-biotics causing disease

Wednesday, August 5th, 2015

Anti-biotics are of huge importance to our health – and disease! Anti-biotics destroy our gut bacteria (as we know) but did you know that between 50 and 80% of anti-biotics in the Western world are in our foods:  pork, beef, chicken, farmed fish and other foods?  Not to mention in our GMO foods that contain anti-bioitics. Hugely linked to all kids health problems. Did you know that Genetically Modified Foods have the anti-biotics, pesticides and herbicides IN the SEEDS, so you CAN’T wash these toxins off!

We end up accidently destroying our immune system each time we eat food that contains anti-biotics.  Is our immune system keeping up with repair and maintenance?

Anti-Biotic use increases hardened, active, bacteria-laden biofilm in our body – and the combination of these are known to be linked to:

  •  cardiovascular disease: bacterial particles (linked to anti-biotic use) is found in the plaque in the arteries in heart disease
  • autism & Asperger’s:  staph & strep bacteria have been found in the basal ganglia of autistic children
  • dementia and Alzheimer’s:  it’s been known for many years that the plaque in the brain has heavy metals, xeno-oestrogens, and bacterial particles
  • diabetes:  the higher the levels of toxins stored in fat mass in the body, the more risk of diabetes.
  • ADHD & learning issues:  there is a huge gut-brain-learning connection.  The worse the gut, the harder it is to stay focussed and learn and concentrate.
  • behavioural problems:  similar issues to ADHD & Learning – behaviour problems, the brain, the gut – all linked
  • chronic fatigue & fibromyalgia: 100% of people with chronic fatigue & fibromyalgia have gut issues, small intestinal bacterial overgrowth & gut issues
  • mitochondrial dysfunction – inability to think, inability to access cellular energy – bacterial particles ‘clog up’ our mechanisms inside our cells and hinder our health
  • and so much more…

Pain – Neuroplasticity and Sports Injuries

Tuesday, March 24th, 2015

Have you heard of the term neuroplasticity and wondered what it means? No, our brains are not made of plastic. However, it does refer to the neural pathways in our brains can be as malleable as plastic allowing our brain to adapt to different circumstances. This means that each signal that enters our brain follows a particular pathway. This pathway can be altered by a change in behaviour.

Recently there has been several case studies to confirm the suggestion that chronic pain is not so much a true indication of current pain but that neural pathways have been developed in the brain to re-affirm the original pain that was experienced. Therefore, the pain which we perceive as chronic pain is not a true indication of anatomical pain but a memory of past pain experienced. Neuroplasticity suggests that neural pathway that has developed can be altered via different input.

There have been several cases which have successfully abated their chronic pain to minimal or none ultimately changing their lives. This has been achieved via activating the neural pathway pattern and flooding the brain with another sensory input. This in turn allows an alternative neural pathway to develop. Each time the new neural pathway is reinforced allows for the new pathway to develop and the old pathway (of pain) decreases in strength and slowly dissipates. Literally turning the old statement of if you don’t use it you lose it to an advantage!

Alternate sensory input may be light or sound. That is, by flooding the neural pathway with another direction to go in each time chronic pain is experienced stimulates new neurons to develop. If this new neuron pathway is reinforced regularly throughout the day the experience of pain has been reported to significantly reduce over a 6 week period.

Chronic pain is usually associated with osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis or other degenerative conditions. However, chronic pain is actually classified after 3 months of experiencing pain in the same region consistently. Therefore this includes sports injuries which are often exacerbated by repetitive movements or sitting stationary for long periods of time (often work related). When this starts to happen reactive muscles can be a factor.

Reactive muscles is the concept of when one muscle is switched on it essentially bullies other muscles that switch off i.e. muscles are reactive towards one another as opposed to firing when appropriate. Reactive muscles can create dysfunctional movement patterns when the body moves. When this is done repetitively it can be reinforced and put strain on muscles which can lead to events causing injury. Upon injury acute inflammation and pain is experienced which is the body’s warning system to rest that area. However, when the acute inflammation dies down is a crucial stage to change the reactive pattern of muscles before the neuronal network of ‘pain’ is laid down and reinforced altering the way the body moves. This pattern can start to reinforce itself in a negative way.

By switching off the reactive muscles allows for any neuronal networks for ‘pain’ to not be reinforced thus reducing the experience of pain. This can be done by kinesiology. Essentially kinesiology identifies and activates a negative neuronal pathway, floods it with a positive stimulus allowing a new neuronal pathway to form i.e. neuroplasticity.

Chronic Fatigue, Mitochondrial Dysfunction, Depression, Chronic Pain Conditions – there is help!

Wednesday, August 20th, 2014

 

What may all of these conditions have in common?  Chronic Fatigue, Depression, Mitochondrial Dysfunction and Chronic Pain Conditions are all linked to:

  1. Old infections that haven’t been fully resolved.  The ‘particles’ and ‘byproducts’ of these old infections, staph or strep, e-coli, glandular fever EBV etc etc, live in the tissues in the body and do not show up in regular blood tests.  It is estimated by some researchers that up to 80% of infections live in the biofilm, hidden deep inside the tissues in the body, and create a low-grade inflammation that is hard to shift medically. Depression is an inflammatory process – we simply can’t have depression without brain inflammation – there’s such a huge gut-brain connection that current research is looking at infections crossing the blood-brain barrier and being one of the many causes of depression.  Herbal tonics, nutritionals, chi nei tsang abdominal massage and kinesiology all help the body to break down the biofilm, recognise the infections, and start eliminating these toxins.
  2. Poor nutritional status:  recommended daily allowances of nutrients are ridiculously low (and totally useless) when we have a chronic health condition – of any sort.  Studies done in the 1970’s with Chronic Fatigue and Fibromyalgia showed (40 years ago) that all nutritional needs were higher once we’re stressed, in pain, not sleeping, working too hard, bed-ridden.  So a multi-vitamin or thinking we’re going to get the nutrition from our foods was disproven decades ago.
  3. When we’re unwell, our body goes into ‘crisis mode’.  That is, it starts running survival patterns which override normal day to day activities – digestion, blood pressure, lung activity, muscular function – this is why a cold or flu, or small car accident, or death in the family – can trigger a weird group of symptoms that often aren’t put together as being linked to the initial incident or episode.  We start to put together these parts of your history, so that the medical conditions that have occurred finally make sense.

We specialise in supporting people with chronic health conditions – nutritionally giving the cells what they need, structural balancing to take the pressure of the body, survival pattern kinesiology to allow the body to start healing… and much more.  Our Foundations of Health programme, particularly (which takes 9-18 months), is designed to work through cleansing the major filters of the body – the gut & digestion, the liver, the kidneys and immune systems – which slowly but surely allows all of the individual cells of the body to have better nutritional status, improves detoxification and improves health.

 

Madonna Guy ND
New Leaf Natural Therapies
3348 6098

Foundations of health – What and Why?

Thursday, June 20th, 2013

 

Foundations of Health is our Gold Standard health care plan. It’s a 9 month Naturopathic plan and addresses your health in a deep, systematic way. We focus on an in-depth cleansing process, starting with clearing the gut and boosting digestive function – vital to our overall health. We continue with the other major filtration systems in the body – the liver, immune system and kidneys. 9 months flies by, there is so much work to do!

Our aim is to lift you out of sub-optimal health and to keep you in excellent health for the long term. It’s ideal for long term health issues (with a medical diagnosis or not!), such as chronic fatigue, poor immunity, cancer, diabetes, allergies, digestive disorders, and many others.

Our Foundations of Health clients enjoy fantastic discount on all other services and Naturopathic testing – Live Blood, VLA, Insulin/Cholesterol, Kinesiology, Remedial massage, Infrared Sauna, Microcurrent, Raindrop Aromatherapy, Chi Nei Tsang Abdominal massage, and Facials.

Health issues and don’t know why? Is it leaky gut?!

Thursday, June 6th, 2013

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Need a viality boost? Trying to lose weight? Crashing in the afternoons?

Wednesday, April 10th, 2013

Many of us still opt out of eating breakfast, or if it is eaten, its a rushed slice of toast that doesn’t sustain us past 10am.. Habits like this can lead to blood sugar crashes, weight gain (you eat less, but your metabolism winds way down and your body keeps all the calories it can when you do eat), fatigue, moodiness, and of course, nutrient deficiencies.  

Breakfast really is the most important meal – it can influence how we eat for the rest of the day! In general, breakfast eaters weigh less than those who skip it. Eating breakfast gets your metabolism going, helps to maintain a healthy body weight, helps you concentrate, have more energy throughout the day and deal better with stress. If you skip breakfast, you are very likely to end up compensating for it later in the day by overeating the wrong foods.

If you lack appetite in the morning, a smoothie is a great way to get an easy to digest, nutrition-packed breakfast. Try this recipe:

Breakfast smoothie

 1 cup almond or rice milk

1 serve of plain, undenatured whey, rice or pea protein powder

1 teaspoon of honey or to taste

1 /2 cup fresh or frozen fruit, such as berries, pear, banana or peaches

A dash of pure vanilla extract or almond extract

1 teaspoon of Spirulina powder or Greens powder

Grated  fresh nutmeg or organic cinnamon powder

 1-2 ice cubes

Blend all ingredients and enjoy. Cinnamon is great for blood sugar balance, Spirulina or greens powders boost energy and add an extra serve of all important greens to your breakfast. Protein supports blood sugar balance and cuts cravings for carbs or sweets later in the day. High quality protein powders are available from the New Leaf clinic dispensary.

For more on weight loss and boosting vitality, immunity and health, see us at the New Leaf clinic for a personalised plan.