Archive for the ‘kinesiology’ Category

LEAP: Learning Enhancement Acupressure Programme – developed by Dr Charles Krebs

Thursday, October 5th, 2017

Logical Creative Brain

LEAP:  What Is It?

LEAP is an Applied Physiology (Kinesiology) protocol which activates areas of the brain which are not currently being accessed fully.  It uses a bio-feedback mechanism which accurately measures inability for specific parts of the brain to function.

Kinesiology uses muscle testing to access specific areas of the brain.  We use acupuncture points (no needles) which have been clinically shown to increase neuronal flow (nerve pathways), glial cell function, increases nutrition and oxygen  to these areas, thereby allowing better function.

LEAP, in combination with adequate brain nutrition and reduction in brain toxins, allows us to be the best we can be!

The inactivity of these areas causes any combination of learning difficulties:

  • comprehension problems,
  • switching of letters (p&d, q&b) maths,
  • poor visual integration
  • poor auditory memory
  • concentration problems (or daydreaming),
  • many  symptoms such as clumsiness and co-ordination difficulties.
  • Stress & inability to remember under stress
  • Higher level comprehension and so much more

The areas of dysfunction in the brain include the frontal lobes (higher thinking functions), logic brain (left side) and gestalt brain – your creative/emotional (right side), along with too much information in the form of fear patterns being stored in the amygdala, causing day to day disruption of brain function.

LEAP:  Who Can Benefit?

Children and adults with learning problems will often be on a Stress Avoidance Cycle, which means the brain will switch off rather than allow the stress of not being able to handle a problem.

Any person who wishes to utilise their brain at the optimum level will benefit by LEAP.

LEAP opens up the pathways in the brain and allows free thinking within any subject, ie, maths/English, and reduces stress associated with fatigue, fluoro lights, computer radiation, mobile phone stress and other common allergens (such as sugars, wheat, candida)

  • Students of all ages
  • People requiring brain power at work
  • Kids with behaviour issues, ADD, ADHD, Autism, Aspergers
  • Post-stroke, post operation poor memory
  • Kids who have had glue ear, birthing problems, vaccine side-effects, stress (such as having siblings!)
  • Kids with poor writing ability, neck & shoulder issues, headaches & migraines

LEAP:  Who Developed It?

Dr Charles Krebs, author of ‘Revolutionary Way of Thinking’ (highly recommended for anyone interested in understanding brain function and integration or the fundamentals of LEAP) is a scientist who had an accident in the 1980’s, which left part of his brain permanently damaged.  When he found Kinesiology, it ultimately changed his life…allowing access to pathways which had ‘shut down’ since his accident.

Dr Krebs not only became a Kinesiologist, but took the protocols one step further and has developed and researched LEAP techniques on over 8000 people.

Dr Krebs currently works in research facilities at Harvard, Germany, Switzerland & London.

LEAP:  Gives Results!!

LEAP is currently having between 80-98% success rate.  Medically, nothing has been found to change the physiology of the brain (in other words, nothing increases brain function), whereas LEAP does!

 

It is a protocol which requires a number of treatments (10-20) and these treatments can be spaced to suit any budget or timeframe.  Children often need a ‘top-up’ every few years when major hormonal or growth spurts take place.  If children or adults are incredibly neurologically disturbed, it may take much longer!  This doesn’t mean that improvements won’t be seen earlier on, it’s about working with the person’s brain & body, finding the deficits and correcting them one by one (in the most neurologically correct order!!)

LEAP truly is revolutionary and should be considered with any learning difficulties, ADD, ADHD and dyslexia.

BREAKTHROUGH FOR DYSLEXIA AND LEARNING DISABILITIES

  • Constantly bumping into things or dropping things.
  • Difficulty in following motion or moving things (balls, people, traffic).
  • Difficulty in following sequential instructions or events.
  • Difficulty in understanding words in normal conversation.
  • Difficulty with reading, writing and mathematics.
  • Doing opposite of what was told.
  • Dysequilibrium (balance dysfunction).
  • Feelings of inferiority, stupidity, clumsiness.
  • Get drowsy or tend to fall asleep while driving on a highway or open road.
  • Gets lost easily or all the time.
  • Inability to concentrate, even when involved in a particular activity, such as a game.
  • Inability to organise daily activities, particularly in allotting proper time.
  • Inability to relate to people in groups or to understand the conversation.
  • Inability to remember numbers.
  • Little or no concept of time
  • Need to reread the same word or phrase to get any meaning out of it.
  • Poor motor coordination.
  • Poor or non-existent sense of direction
  • Sharp emotional or mood swings.
  • Stuttering, hesitant speech, poor word recall.
  • Unable to, or unsure in making decisions.
  • Various phobias (including height), motion-related (elevators, bridges, etc.)

 

And many, many more.  This is a multi-faceted condition, which escapes detection many times because of its diverse symptomatology.

Discuss a kinesiology programme for you or your child at New Leaf Natural Therapies.

Check out our You Tube Channel:  New Leaf Health Team

Madonna Guy ND
New Leaf Natural Therapies
07 3348 6098
healthteam@newleafnaturaltherapies.com.au

 

PSYCHOSOMATIC DISORDERS: the mind-body connection!

Friday, July 7th, 2017

Doctors to whom I speak to are more aware now of the mind-body connection and are noticing people who attend their clinics with physical symptoms driven from psychological issues rather than medical ones.

Did you know that nearly 50% of heart tissue is made up of brain neurons?  Now we know why we FEEL with our hearts

They are recognising how phantom symptoms which are real for the sufferer are not showing up as organic diseases measured in blood tests, hormonal in-balances or the presence of a primary disease. What we know is that brain through its thinking mechanisms, and our bodies via emotions and feelings, are able to produce other effects and symptoms of what may mimic a known disease or disorder. The problem is that when you investigate or use a conventional treatment on the assumed problem it does not resolve the issue. We know the types of conditions include seizures, paralysis, blindness, deafness, headaches, severe pain and many other bodily symptoms such as sweating, stomach cramps, palpitations and bloating.

It is a hard diagnosis to convey that is all in your head or psychologically linked but yet true. This does not diminish or negate the issue but simply switches the approach and emphasis of how to look at where the treatment approach should focus and work from. The issue is real and is treated as such by body centric psychotherapy and it is an area where success has been obtained by considering such a cause may exist where conventional medicine cannot achieve healing of whatever condition exists.

So, how can we help with psychosomatic symptoms?

At New Leaf we do lots of techniques to help you find and work through psychosomatic illnesses….

Kinesiology – helps to find old patterns, beliefs, disconnections that are not allowing us to live our best life.  Kinesiology also helps us target the source of the problem and work out supplements which are most effective for you

Quantum Consciousness healings – Rob helps clients find their way, heal the past through a talk-therapy-visualisation process that helps to look at the root causes of addictions, stress and pain

LEAP – helps to integrate pathways of the brain which aren’t working – and are stopping logical and creative thinking in order to find solutions

Flower Essence Combinations – we design flower essences specifically for you and the emotional issues you need to work through!

Call us on 3348 6098 or email on healthteam@newleafnaturaltherapies.com.au to chat about what appointment will be best for you.

Madonna Guy ND
New Leaf Natural Therapies

 

 

LEAP: The Learning Enhancement Acupressure Program – by Dr Charles T. Krebs

Tuesday, July 26th, 2016

We’ve been doing kinesiology at New Leaf Natural Therapies for 20 years.  LEAP is an integrative approach to supporting better brain function – for moods, stress, survival patterns, learning problems, damaging behaviours, anxiety, suicidal thoughts…

LEAP®: The Learning Enhancement Acupressure Program: Correcting

Learning and Memory Problems with Acupressure and Kinesiology.

By Dr. Charles T. Krebs

ABSTRACT:

The Learning Enhancement Acupressure Program, or LEAP®, has been developed since 1985 inconjunction with clinical psychologists, speech pathologists, neurologists and other health professionals, as a very effective program for the correction of most learning difficulties. LEAP® is based on a new model of learning integrating recent concepts in neurophysiology of the brain and uses highly specific acupressure formatting to address stress within specific brain structures. The application of specific non-invasive acupressure and other energetic techniques can then resolve these stresses resulting in a return to normal function.

In the LEAP® model of learning Gestalt and Logic functions are not simply localised in the right or left cerebral hemisphere as in the popular Right Brain/Left Brain model of learning. But rather, each type of conscious brain function or process appears to have a cerebral “lead” function that is either predominantly Gestalt (Visuo-spatial, Global) or Logic (Linear, Sequential) in nature. These cortical “lead” functions provide a “point of entry” into a widely distributed system comprising many subconscious cortical sub-modules in both hemispheres and many subconscious subcortical modules throughout the limbic system and brainstem.

While the Gestalt and Logic “lead” functions are conscious, these functions are dependent upon many levels of subconscious sensory processing at many levels within the nervous system. While this processing through multiplexing and parallel processing at many different levels is highly efficient, it means that brain processing is “time bound”. Since many components of any mental function are performed in many different parts of the brain, and often at different speeds, coherent output in the form of “thinking” requires integration and synchronisation of all of these separate processes.

Loss of integrated brain function, termed loss of Brain Integration in LEAP®, thus results in the loss of a specific mental capacity, the ability to perform a specific type of mental task. When these specific mental capacities are required for academic performance, their loss can result in Specifi Learning Disabilities.

Specific Learning Disabilities (SLDs) arise in this model by either lack of access to specific subconscious processing modules, either cortical or subcortical, or the de-synchronisation of neural flows in the integrative pathways linking processing modules. Thus to resolve SLDs, you need only “open up” access to the “blocked” processing modules or re-synchronise the timing of information flow between them to re-instate integrated brain function.

The LEAP® program provides an integrated acupressure protocol using direct muscle biofeedback (kinesiology) as a tool to identify “stress” within specific brain nuclei and areas that have “blocked” integrated function. The application of the LEAP® acupressure protocol using acupressure and other energetic based techniques to re-synchronise brain function resolves learning and memory problems in a high percent of cases.

HISTORY OF SPECIFIC LEARNING DIFFICULTIES.

Difficulties with learning academic tasks such as reading, spelling and mathematics have been recognised for over a century, with Kussmaul in 1877 ascribed as the first person to specifically describe an inability to read, that persisted in the presence of intact sight and speech, as word blindness.1 The word dyslexia was coined by Berlin in 1887.2 Within a decade a Glasgow eye surgeon James Hinschelwood (1895) and a Seaford General Practitioner Pringle Morgan (1896) observed students who were incapable of learning to read and hypothesised that this was based on a failure of development of the relevant brain areas which were believed to be absent or abnormal.

This model was based on the assumption that developmental dyslexia (congenital dyslexia) was similar in form to acquired dyslexia, which is dyslexia due to brain damage after a person has already learned to read. Deficits in other types of learning, such as mathematics, would also result from some other underlying brain damage or abnormality.3

Work in the early part of the twentieth century, particularly by Samuel T. Orton in the 1920s and 1930s suggested that learning difficulties such as dyslexia were not based on anatomical absence or abnormality, but rather it was delay in the development of various areas that caused these dysfunctions. This belief was largely ignored until the 1960s when it was revived by a growing interest in neuropsychology. However, more recent developments in neuropsychology and neurophysiology support the hypothesis that dysfunctions within the brain, both anatomical and developmental, may be causal in many learning problems.4

It was not until 1963, in an address given by Samuel Kirk, who argued for better descriptions of children’s school problems that the term “learning disabilities” originated. Since that time there’s been a proliferation of labels that attempt to dissociate the learning disabled from the retarded and brain damaged.

Definitions

In the context of this synopsis, Specific Learning Disorders or Disabilities (SLDs) relates to problems with physical co-ordination and acquiring the academic skills of reading, writing, spelling and mathematics including both Dyslexia and Attention Deficit Disorder (ADD) with or without hyperactivity. ADD with hyperactivity is now commonly called Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) or hyperkinetic disorder in Europe. Historically, Dyslexia has been widely defined in terms of deficits in the areas of reading, spelling and language. However, more recent conceptualisations have included a definition that also encompasses a wide range of problems, including clumsiness and difficulty with rote learning.5 Fawcett and Nicolson have also challenged the prevailing hypothesis that Dyslexia is merely a language based problem, suggesting that it might be a more generalised deficit in the acquisition of skills.6

The term Dyslexia is not defined in the DSM IV (1994) although it is still commonly used in literature discussing various learning difficulties. The term Learning Disorders (DSM IV) currently encompasses various types of learning difficulties including dyslexia and Attention Deficit Disorder (ADD). Learning Disorders are defined in the DSM IV as being essentially a persistent pattern of inattention and/or hyperactivity-impulsivity that is more frequent and severe than is typically observed in individuals at a comparable level of development. The performance of these individuals on standardised tests for reading, mathematics, or written expression is substantially below, more than 2 standard deviations (SDs), same age peers even though their IQ scores are average or above average.7

Incidence

Frequently, children diagnosed as learning disabled are also inattentive and deficient in linguistic skills, most often in reading.8 Rutter and Yule examined a large population of children from a number of different studies and found 3.5% of Isle of Wight 10-year-olds, 4.5% of 14-year-olds and over 6% of London 10-year-olds showed reading difficulties.9 Gaddes looked at the proportion of children with learning disorders in various studies in both North America and Europe and found that the need for special training for learning disorders ranged between 10-15% of the school age population.10 However, estimates of the prevalence of learning disorders for broad age ranges is problematic because a learning disability is an emergent problem that is often not evident until later years in schooling. Using the criteria of defining learning disorders as being two years behind on standardised tests, less than 1% of 6-year-olds are disabled, 2% of 7-year-olds and so on until at age 19, 25% would be classified as learning disabled. So these children fall progressively behind as they mature and the complexity of work increases.11 In an address given by the Australian Federal Schools Minister, Dr David Kemp, in October 1996, Kemp stated that a study of 28,000 students in four surveys in Australia found 30% of year 9 students lacked basic literacy skills. This high incidence of learning disorders in school children indicates a need for effective treatment. Studies in other countries, both English, French and German support these figures, so specific learning difficulties, which cover all types of learning disabilities from dyslexia, reading problems, ADD to ADHD, probably represent greater than 15% of school-aged children, and may be as high as one third of all school-aged children.

Causes

Currently hypotheses concerning learning disorders suggest that they are primarily the result of one or more of five major factors;

1) structural damage,
2) brain dysfunction,
3) abnormal cerebral lateralisation,
4) maturational lag and
5) environment deprivation.

While none of these theories is unequivocally supported by current data, all of these factors may contribute in varying degrees to learning disabilities.12

Brain damage and overt brain dysfunction would appear to account for a relatively small percentage of children with learning disorders. The great majority of other children with learning disorders do not typically show many of the neurological symptoms associated with brain damage in adults. For instance, EEG and CT studies have not shown structural damage and abnormal EEGs correlated with known brain damage are not consistently observed in children with learning disorders.13 Rather than direct brain damage, there is evidence that abnormal physiological or biochemical processes may be responsible for malfunction in some part of the cerebral cortex.

Electrophysiological recording studies have associated specific high frequency EEG and AEP (averaged evoked potentials) abnormalities with various types of learning disorders.14 Recent studies with SSVEP (Steady state visual evoked potential) have shown that children diagnosed with Attention Deficit Disorder demonstrate similar abnormal SSVEP patterns when compared to normal subjects while performing the same cognitive task.15 The brain dysfunction hypothesis suggests that the dysfunction may be a consequence of defective arousal mechanisms resulting in some form of inadequate cerebral activation.16

This is supported by studies of children with learning disorders that show they have difficulty on continuous performance tests requiring attention and low distractibility; had slower reaction times to stimuli, and increased errors due to impulsivity on tests of visual searching.17 Douglas proposed that the deficits on these tasks resulted from inadequate cerebral activation. Learning disorders of some types at least, do improve with drugs like amphetamines that cause cerebral activation via increasing subcortical arousal. In fact this is the basis of treating hyperactive children with Ritalin.18

An alternative model of learning disorders is based on recent neurophysiological findings that suggest it is the timing and synchronisation of neural activity in separate brain areas that creates high order cognitive functions. Any loss or malfunction of the timing mechanism may cause disintegration of neural activity and hence dysfunction in cognitive tasks.19 Clearly, brain dysfunction due to inadequate cerebral activation may indeed lead to disruption of the timing and synchronisation of neural flows, and thus these two hypotheses may just be different aspects of the same process.

This model supports the approach in the Learning Enhancement Advanced Program (LEAP®) that Dr. Krebs developed in the late 1980s early 1990s.20 In the LEAP® Model, Specific Learning Disorders are based on the disruption or loss of timing and synchronisation between the neural activity in the diverse brain regions, both cortical and subcortical, that must be synchronised in order for successful integration to produce normal cognitive activity. Learning disorders would arise in this model from a lack of integration of functions that occur simultaneously in separate brain regions.

If the brain does integrate separate processes into meaningful combinations we call ‘thought’ or cognitive ability, then the main risk is mis-timing or loss of synchronisation between these processes. To quote Damasio “any malfunction of the timing mechanism would be likely to create spurious integration or disintegration”.21 For synchronous firing of neurons in many separate brain areas to create cognitive functions would require maintenance of focused activity at these different sites long enough for meaningful integration of disparate information and decisions to be made.

THE LEAP® MODEL OF LEARNING:

From a review of the major brain structures and the workings of learning and memory in the neurological literature, it is clear that both memory and learning do not involve a single, global hierarchical system in the brain. But rather, learning involves interplay between many inter-linked sub-systems or modules.22 Also, the timing and synchronisation of information flow between these sub-systems and modules appears to be critical to the success of learning and coherent cognitive function.

However, the sub-systems or modules underlying both learning and memory are both conscious and subconscious with most of the early leveling processing being totally subconscious, and only the highest levels of neural processing reaching consciousness. Yet, it is indeed these conscious modules that initiate and direct the processing to be done by the subconscious modules, as both learning and memory require “conscious” effort to occur. This means that the memory and learning processes can be disrupted at both the conscious and subconscious levels, depending upon which neural substrates or integrative pathways are disrupted.

Sensory processing of all types is initially a relatively linear chain of neural impulses originating from a generator potential of the sensory receptor, and following a chain of neurons into the Central Nervous System (CNS) and brain. However, this initially linear stream of nerve impulses, the data of the CNS, rapidly becomes divergent and multiplexed at higher levels of cortical processing.

Conscious perception only arises at the highest levels of these multiplexed data flows as they are reintegrated back into unified conscious perception by the cortical columns directing all conscious brain activity. Thinking and other cognitive abilities rely upon all of the proceeding levels of subconscious sensory processing, which are predominately bilateral initially, but which become progressively asymmetrical and lateralised with increasing levels of conscious awareness. Sensory information is processed initially as neural flows of increasing complexity that generate preverbal images and symbols, but becomes increasingly defined by language in higher level cognitive processes. And language by its very nature is based upon abstract representations of external reality (called words), that follow linear rules (grammar), and word order linked to meaning (syntax). Hence it is predominately sequential and linear in form, which permits analytical evaluation of the thoughts generated following rational rules of Logic. From the perspective of Logic, the world is interpreted as parts that can be constructed into a whole via deductive reasoning.

Sensory and other mental data not suitable for language-based rational processing is processed via visuo-spatial image and symbols that permit global, holistic comprehension of the whole and is inherently non-rational.23 This global, simultaneous, non-rational visuo-spatial processing has been termed Gestalt (German for pattern or form), with the meaning of the whole extracted via inductive reasoning. From the Gestalt perspective, the world is seen as a “whole” with intuitive understanding of the properties of the whole. There is no rational analysis of “Why?”, it just “Is”.

In the LEAP® Model of Learning, it is recognized that most of the lower level linear sensory processing occurs below conscious perception, that is either subcortical, being processed in the brainstem or other brain nuclei like the hypothalamus, thalamus, basal ganglia, etc., or is palaeocortical and limbic. Even the basal levels of cortical processing are largely bilateral and subconscious, and thus occur outside of conscious perception. All higher level cortical processing, which may become conscious, is thus reliant upon maintenance of integrated function and neural flows at these subconscious levels.

However, the more overtly cognitive components of learning rapidly become lateralised with processing dominated by activation of cortical columns, the functional units of the neocortex, in one hemisphere of the brain or the other. In right-handed people, Logic processing typically activates cortical columns in the left hemisphere, that then process the data in a linear analytical way, while activation of cortical columns in the right hemisphere process data in a Gestalt, visuo-spatial way.

Thus, at the highest levels of conscious neural processing underlying cognition and thought, whether that “thought” be verbally based language of Logic, or global intuitively based “knowing” of Gestalt, the neural processing is highly lateralised and is predominately processed in the right or left hemisphere.

The neural substrates for all “conscious” functions therefore are cortical columns of the neocortex (Fig. 1). Conscious activation of a cortical column acts to initiate a cascade of neural flows that rapidly spread to other cortical areas both conscious and subconscious in both hemispheres, and also into many subcortical structures as well. These consciously activated cortical columns initiate either Gestalt or Logic functions depending in which hemisphere they are located.

In LEAP® we term cortical columns activating Logic functions, Logic “lead” functions, and those activating Gestalt functions, Gestalt “lead” functions. These “lead” functions provide points of entry into an inter-linked set of cortical and subcortical modules that then perform our mental functions.

Figure 1. Cortical Columns. Vertical slabs of cortex consisting of all six distinct cell layers, called cortical columns, are the functional units of the cerebral cortex. Some of the cells like the large pyramidal cells have dendrites that extend through almost all layers and axons that exit the gray matter to become part of the white matter tracts carrying information to other parts of the brain and body. There are also innumerable interneurons connecting the cells within each cell layer and between the layers.

Indeed, it was a misunderstanding about the nature of these “lead” functions from which the popular “Right Brain – Left Brain” model of learning and brain function arose. Because damage to specific cortical columns caused loss of specific conscious functions, e.g. the ability to form an image, or figure out certain types of problems or solve certain types of puzzles, it was assumed that the damaged area actually did that specific function. In reality, all that cortical column did was provide a point of entry into these inter-linked sets of cortical and subcortical modules that actually performed the function lost because of the damage to the cortical “lead” function.

An analogy would be damage to the “K” key on your keyboard. Your consciousness is still intact and able to initiate “K” questions, and your computer system is still able to process and answer “K” questions, but the interface to initiate “K” processing in the computer has been damaged. Like wise, if a Gestalt “lead” function is damaged, the process initiated by this “lead” function no longer activates the inter-linked cortical and subcortical functions that are required for this process to occur. Thus, while damage to the area initiating a function, “blocks” the rest of the processing needed to perform the function, the area initiating function never actually ever “did” the function in the first place. To continue this analogy, in most cases it is not overt “damage” to the cortical “lead” function or subcortical brain areas that prevents effective thinking, but rather “blocked” access to these brain areas due to some stressor that is the problem. Thus, much in the same way a “sticky” key blocks fluent typing, “blocked access” to specific brain areas blocks effective thinking and problem-solving.

Synopsis of the LEAP® Model of Learning:

In summary, the LEAP® Model of Learning is based on the following suppositions about the nature and location of neural processing underlying learning and memory:

Sensory processing initiated by sensory receptors generates initially linear neural flows that rapidly diverge at each successive processing centre (spinal and cranial nerve ganglia, brainstem nuclei, subcortical nuclei, limbic cortices, and finally neocortical columns) into a number of different complex data streams. All processing below the neocortex is subconscious.

Each processing centre, at each successive level within the spinal cord, brainstem, diencephalon, basal forebrain and cortex elaborates the sensory data, defining some aspect more than another, or adds additional types of information needed to define the sensory data further at the next level of processing. All processing below the neocortex is subconscious.

At the higher cortical levels, input from many lower levels both cortical and subcortical is integrated to form a conscious perception of the initial sensory experience.

These higher cortical levels not only integrate processing of the “raw” sensory data, but also include integration of input from memory areas about past experiences with similar sensory stimuli.

At the highest cortical levels the conscious perceptions formed at lower cortical levels are further processed asymmetrically in either Gestalt or Logic cortical columns, and hence perceived as a visuos-patial pattern or a Gestalt, or abstractly as a verbal word based language or an abstract symbol based mathematical language.

The very highest levels of conscious processing that underlie our thinking about conscious perceptions, while dependent upon input from all areas of the brain, are generally frontal lobe and particularly involve working memory areas in the Dorsolateral Frontal Cortex.

A whole set of basal brainstem mechanisms maintain the organism in a state of homeostasis, such that higher level conscious sensory processing can proceed effectively:

These include the Reticular Activating System, the Periventricular Survival System, the Vestibular System and the Sensory-Motor System. Imbalances within or between these systems may disrupt on-going sensory processing and integration at this and higher levels. Processing at this level is totally subconscious.

The initial “raw” data stream is “sampled” by the Amygdala and other survival centres in the brainstem, and coloured by the survival emotions paired or associated with the sensory stimuli being analyzed, including the physiological responses to these emotions, and is the basis of Conditioned Learning. These primary survival emotions may disrupt on-going sensory processing and integration at this and higher levels. Processing at this level is subconscious.

When survival emotions of the Fight or Flight response are activated above some “threshold” value, the amygdala and other brainstem structures such as the Periaqueductal Grey Matter of the midbrain inhibit frontal cortical processing, interfering with reasoning and problem-solving. The cause of this loss of higher level conscious cortical processing is a direct consequence of activation of the subconscious primary survival emotions of the Limbic System and Brainstem.

Secondary processing of the sensory stimuli in the Brainstem, Limbic System and lower cortical levels generates a series of control functions defining the nature of the sensory data stream (e.g. control of pupils in vision) and second-order integration of this sensory data (e.g. movement, shape and location of object in space). Processing at this level is subconscious.

Further processing in the palaecortical components of the Limbic System (e.g. hippocampus, cingulate, subcallosal and orbitofrontal cortices) generates secondary emotions relative to the sensory data stream and primary emotions already supplied by the amygdala and other brainstem areas via sampling memory of related events. These secondary limbic emotions may disrupt on-going sensory processing and integration at this and higher levels. Processing at this level is largely subconscious.

Initial cortical processing is predominately bilateral and subconscious, and is dependent upon earlier processing at brainstem and subcortical levels. Emotions, either primary or secondary, may disrupt on-going sensory processing and integration at this and higher levels.

At some level of cortical processing the sensory data stream emerges into a conscious perception, and is dependent upon earlier processing at brainstem, subcortical, and earlier cortical levels. Emotions, either primary or secondary, may disrupt on-going integration at this and higher levels

At the highest levels of cortical processing, the processing is largely done in one hemisphere or the other and perceived consciously as a logical, rational thought or a visuospatial Gestalt, and is dependent upon earlier processing at brainstem, subcortical and cortical levels. Emotions, either primary or secondary, may disrupt on-going integration at this level, and any “thinking” dependent upon this level of processing.

Thinking about the fully processed and integrated sensory experience in the frontal lobes, based upon remembered sensory experiences relevant to the current experience may lead to decisions, which will be represented neurologically by activation of either Logic or Gestalt “lead” functions or both.

These “lead” functions will then initiate a cascade of neurological flow, which is initially frontal cortical, but rapidly flows into other cortical areas and subcortical structures like the basal ganglia, thalamus, and cerebellum, which in turn feedback to the cortex and each other. Emotions, either primary or secondary, may disrupt on-going processing and integration at any level of this process, and thus overtly affect the final outcome of the cognitive functions taking place.

Coherent neurological processing at any stage of the above process is dependent upon both uninterrupted flows along integrative pathways and within integrative processing centres. Disruption or de-synchronisation of the timing of these integrative neural flows or disruption or de-synchronisation of processing in any of the integrative centres may result in loss of cognitive function.

Maintaining integration along all integrative pathways and within all integrative centres produces optimum function, a state called Brain Integration in LEAP.

Loss of integrated brain function is the principal cause of dysfunction in both mental and physical performance, called Loss of Brain Integration in LEAP.

The primary mechanism causing Loss of Brain Integration is de-synchronisation and loss of timing of neural flows along integrative pathways and within integrative centres by inhibition or excitation of these pathways and centres by neural flows originating from brainstem and limbic survival related emotions.

On-going Loss of Brain Integration is often generated by early childhood trauma that creates long-term disruption of Brain Integration as a mechanism of coping.

Other factors affecting Brain Integration are genetic, structural, organic brain damage, and environmental stressors:

o Structural defects or abnormalities can be of developmental origin, e.g. neuronal migration problems, or result from toxin exposure at specific critical periods of development, e.g. fetal alcohol syndrome. Many cognitive defects have been shown to correlate with abnormalities in brain structure.24

o Organic Brain Damage may result from a head injury, and this damage often results in sclerosis that disrupts neural flows underlying Brain Integration (e.g. hippocampal sclerosis and subsequent epilepsy are often associated with learning disorders).

o Genetic Factors affecting Brain Integration are often genes that code for specific alleles for specific enzymes involved in maintaining normal levels of neurotransmitters or receptors in brain circuits.25 Deficiencies in either neurotransmitters or receptors will compromise Brain Integration, and have behavioural consequences. This is both the basis of much ADHD behaviour and the justification for drug use to ameliorate these behaviours.26

Other genes may code for alleles that affect fatty acid metabolism and utilisation, especially in maintaining neuronal membrane stability and function. This affects predominately physical co-ordination and reading.27

o Diet and nutritional deficiencies may also compromise brain function and result in loss of Brain Integration. Diets rich in fast or junk foods often create marginal nutritional deficiencies that may disrupt brain function, and often contain various preservatives and additives, like the azo-food dye tartrazine, that may cause a total loss of brain integration in sensitive individuals28.

Indeed, the misbehaviour and academic performance of children and young adults have been shown to improve significantly with diet change or nutritional supplementation29, and several recent books have discussed this aspect of behaviour and learning problems30.

o Environmental factors such as electromagnetic fields emitted from man-made electronic equipment and Geopathic stress from distortions in the earth’s electromagnetic fields may affect the brain integration of sensitive individuals and result in learning problems. 31

Loss of Brain Integration and Compensation

When Brain Integration is lost via disruption of the most efficient neural pathways and/or centres, either by organic damage or by functional inhibition of cortical or subcortical functions due to outputs from survival centres in the brain, specific conscious functions dependent upon this integration is also disrupted. The overt loss of conscious function is, however, often far less than the degree of interference with underlying functions might suggest because the brain is a master at compensation and will automatically compensate for these disrupted flows by using other areas of the brain, both conscious and subconscious to produce the most efficient processing possible.

Thus, even children with considerable organic brain damage will often establish compensatory neurological patterns of activity to produce varying levels of function in spite of massive disruption of neural pathways underlying normal function, e.g. children with cerebral palsy may learn to walk and talk. It is indeed this tremendous compensatory capacity of the brain that allows even highly disintegrated brains to produce some degree of function, however, the level of dysfunction controls the degree of compensation. Thus, the greater the degree of dysfunction present, the lesscompensation that is possible.

If the disruption of integrated function is at the more basal levels of integration, the ability to compensate for the resulting dysfunction is much more limited than if the loss of integration is at a higher level of processing because all higher levels of processing are dependent upon the quality of the data integrated at earlier levels of processing. For instance, while damage to an early component of vision, say the retina or optic nerve totally disrupts sight, damage and hence loss of integration in the V3 area of the occipital cortex may leave the image fully intact, but disrupt only colour vision.

When the highest levels of cortical integration are disrupted directly or lower level cortical or subcortical functions underlying these higher cortical functions are disrupted, we may lose the capacity to “think” in certain ways. For instance, we may maintain Gestalt creative abilities (e.g. be good at art and design), but lose the ability to perform even simple mathematics because of the loss of the ability to abstract (e.g. are hopeless at maths). Specific Learning Disorders result from the loss of integration in of higher-level cortical functions or lower-level subconscious cortical or subcortical functions supporting these higher-level functions directly activated by consciousness.

Children and adults suffering Specific Learning Disorders usually know what they need to do, often even how to do it (e.g. I want to spell this word, so I need to sequence the letters and remember this sequence). But they just cannot activate the necessary subcortical and cortical processing to do what they know how and want to do consciously because of loss of integration at some level of neural processing required to do this function. When this loss of Brain Integration affects their ability to read, spell, write or do mathematics, it results in SLDs. However, they will still attempt to perform these functions, but in some compensated way. For instance, a child that cannot spell words correctly (that is, visually in English), still attempts to spell words, but using phonetics to compensate for the “mind’s eye” image he/she cannot create.

Because the level at which the integration is disrupted is unknown to the consciousness and compensation is largely subconscious and automatic, a person with Specific Learning Disorders is only aware that some function is difficult or not possible to perform, but not why this is so. Most often Brain Integration is lost in subconscious functions that were never accessible to our consciousness in the first place.

Looking After Others Means Looking After Yourself

Saturday, October 17th, 2015

One of the challenging things in life is when we start to get older and family or close friends start to receive diagnosis of their health. Yes, I’m talking cancer in the family. It’s one of the most challenging things one goes through when loved ones start to show symptoms, go through treatment with drastic side effects and with the looming query of: what’s going to happen next?

The overwhelming sense that one can’t really do much, the underwhelm of not being able to do much except comfort the person which is really hard to do when we’re rundown, exhausted, worried and busy with normal life. So what can we do apart from cook dinners?

You can look after yourself. Yes, it is one of the best things you can do as a support person to someone and don’t feel guilty about good health! When you’re rocking the sense of wellbeing:

  • it is a natural pick-me-up for others
  • you have more energy to do support jobs i.e. driving to appointments, cooking and preparing food, changing bed sheets, helping shower
  • it’s easier to maintain positive, non-judgemental and a calming vibe
  • you become more emotionally resilient
  • and are more able to enjoy more moments along the way

Let’s break it down:

Maintaining a sense of personal balance and wellbeing actually means:

  • maintaining good sleep wherever possible. Sleep is necessary for the body to replenish stores and do minor repairs around the body from the day.
  • Maintaining a balance of hormones. Why is this so important? Hormones are the bodies messengers to tell parts of the body to do things. Yes, reproduction is a result from hormones but they also have a great effect on keeping us calm, awake, good focus, active with energy and even sleep when it’s bed time. If one is over used then it’s eventually like a game of domino’s, but not quite as fun.
  • Maintaining good energy means everything becomes easier! Doom and gloom isn’t an overbearing sense but more a sense of acceptance and you are more likely to make more good moments.
  • Having good energy means eating good food and often. Food is our fuel therefore there is some truth to “You are what you eat”. Good energy means having enough energy to make breakfast lunch and dinner for yourself and whoever else you need to. When we’re busy, stressed and overwhelmed one of the first things to go out the window is dinner and/or breakfast. This is effectively not putting good fuel in the engine and expecting it to do a Formula 1 race every day. The maths just doesn’t add up, does it? Preparing good nutritious food is paramount and may take a bit of organising but should be a priority on your to-do list.
  • Taking care of any aches, pains and health issues of your own so when you’re with your loved one you can be as present and focussed with them as possible.

So we’ve talked benefits, now the big question is: how?

I’m a Naturopath and Kinesiologist so I’m going to say naturopathy and kinesiology works wonders! So I will go through some benefits however if your thing is massage do that. And do it regularly!

I love naturopathy as essentially it’s utilising herbs, nutrients, food as medicine, flower essences and even appropriate homeopathics to support and maintain wellbeing. For example often stress and energy are big ones that need support as they can unwind everything else. There are some fantastic herbs called adaptogens that help support energy levels whilst calming the nerves. Herbs can cater specifically for your personal health requirements whether it be stress, energy, pain and inflammation or digestion. They can make day to day life easier!

Whereas Kinesiology can essential give an indication of where the stress is affecting your body, how to balance it and what herbs, nutrients, foods or other remedies are the priority to maintain wellbeing and balance J

Other fantastic modalities that can be used alongside or instead of are:

  • Massage – If you have aches and pains and respond well to massage book one in regularly. A one off is nice, but an ongoing weekly or fortnightly massage works wonders for stress and energy management long term.
  • Reflexology – via pressure points on the feet this modality also works on rebalancing energy systems (and organs). Plus you get to lie down for one hour and totally relax into an amazing foot rub!
  • Chi Nei Tsang – this is a particular massage style for your belly. It is really good for digestion as when we are stressed, busy and tired our digestion often takes the brunt of it all and starts to not work as well. And what does digestion do? It processes our fuel (i.e. food) so we can use it efficiently. Therefore digestion is really important.

Some people like to mix it up, that is naturopathy/kinesiology every three weeks to keep on top of things and in between a massage, reflexology or chi nei tsang. It’s whatever works for you!

Pain – Neuroplasticity and Sports Injuries

Tuesday, March 24th, 2015

Have you heard of the term neuroplasticity and wondered what it means? No, our brains are not made of plastic. However, it does refer to the neural pathways in our brains can be as malleable as plastic allowing our brain to adapt to different circumstances. This means that each signal that enters our brain follows a particular pathway. This pathway can be altered by a change in behaviour.

Recently there has been several case studies to confirm the suggestion that chronic pain is not so much a true indication of current pain but that neural pathways have been developed in the brain to re-affirm the original pain that was experienced. Therefore, the pain which we perceive as chronic pain is not a true indication of anatomical pain but a memory of past pain experienced. Neuroplasticity suggests that neural pathway that has developed can be altered via different input.

There have been several cases which have successfully abated their chronic pain to minimal or none ultimately changing their lives. This has been achieved via activating the neural pathway pattern and flooding the brain with another sensory input. This in turn allows an alternative neural pathway to develop. Each time the new neural pathway is reinforced allows for the new pathway to develop and the old pathway (of pain) decreases in strength and slowly dissipates. Literally turning the old statement of if you don’t use it you lose it to an advantage!

Alternate sensory input may be light or sound. That is, by flooding the neural pathway with another direction to go in each time chronic pain is experienced stimulates new neurons to develop. If this new neuron pathway is reinforced regularly throughout the day the experience of pain has been reported to significantly reduce over a 6 week period.

Chronic pain is usually associated with osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis or other degenerative conditions. However, chronic pain is actually classified after 3 months of experiencing pain in the same region consistently. Therefore this includes sports injuries which are often exacerbated by repetitive movements or sitting stationary for long periods of time (often work related). When this starts to happen reactive muscles can be a factor.

Reactive muscles is the concept of when one muscle is switched on it essentially bullies other muscles that switch off i.e. muscles are reactive towards one another as opposed to firing when appropriate. Reactive muscles can create dysfunctional movement patterns when the body moves. When this is done repetitively it can be reinforced and put strain on muscles which can lead to events causing injury. Upon injury acute inflammation and pain is experienced which is the body’s warning system to rest that area. However, when the acute inflammation dies down is a crucial stage to change the reactive pattern of muscles before the neuronal network of ‘pain’ is laid down and reinforced altering the way the body moves. This pattern can start to reinforce itself in a negative way.

By switching off the reactive muscles allows for any neuronal networks for ‘pain’ to not be reinforced thus reducing the experience of pain. This can be done by kinesiology. Essentially kinesiology identifies and activates a negative neuronal pathway, floods it with a positive stimulus allowing a new neuronal pathway to form i.e. neuroplasticity.

We’d like to (re)introduce ourselves!

Thursday, June 20th, 2013

Our team has changed dramatically over the past 12 months, and we have a wonderful team of diverse and highly skilled practitioners whom we’d like to introduce here;

– Our team is led by Madonna, a fantastic Naturopath and Kinesiologist with over 20 years’ experience treating a huge range of conditions.

Norm has been with us for several years and is a Kinesiologist with many years’ experience, specialising in the LEAP and NOT systems. Norm sees many children in the clinic with great success with learning and brain integration issues. He treats adults as well and integrates Nutrition and Kinesiology.  The NOT Process is about structural alignment – great for people with long-term pain and inflammatory conditions, scoliosis, jaw and hip problems, lack of concentration, poor immunity and poor digestive function, endocrine disorders such as thyroid and menstrual problems and so much more.

Kat is a Musculoskeletal Therapist and Kinesiologist with a unique ability, tapping into the emotional and spiritual aspects of the body through kinesiology, and supporting multidimensional wellness.  Kat is also a live blood practitioner, and often combines live blood screenings, followed by a kinesiology session to ‘balance’ what has been found in the blood and w0rks out what is important nutritionally for the client.

Gabby is our original New Leaf team member and our most recent practitioner addition! Gabby combines her gift of Intuitive Healing with Counselling Kinesiology to support emotional healing and balance.

Reenee-Jee is a skilled massage therapist, easing tensions and stress through remedial massage, hot stone therapy, and luxurious facials with the high performance, natural facial products from Arbonne.

We work as a cohesive, co-ordinated team, combining our skills to create truly integrated natural health care.  The list of conditions we are able to address are endless!

Adrenal Fatigue/Chronic Fatigue – Natural Support at New Leaf

Friday, June 14th, 2013

Adrenal Fatigue is such a huge problem in society these days, each person’s history is totally different, and the ability to prescribe a one-off bottle of Adrenotone and fixing it is just about over.

Signs that you may have adrenal fatigue!

1. increased caffeine intake
2. increased snacking to control blood sugar fluctuations
3. increased fatigue
4. increased irritability
5. increased sleep problems If you feel “wired but tired” you likely need some adrenal support.
6. development of any long-term disease
7. ADD, ADHD, inability to think clearly
Some of our favourite supplements and protocols for Adrenal Fatigue are:
1.  Kinesiology for Immune & Endocrine balancing, stress, dealing with traumas
2.  Frequency Specific Microcurrent:  helps to remove toxins caused by inflammation
3.  Remedial Massage, Hot Stone Massage, Relaxing Massage & Infrared Saunas:  increases serotonin levels, reduces inflammatory hormones and helps us to heal
4.  Supplements:
*  Adrenotone – combination of nutrients which help thyroid and adrenal fatigue
*  Ultra Flora Immune, Andro NK, Bactrex, Parex, Costat, Waiora NCD – for those who have a history with infections preceding fatigue
*  Gaba, Proxan, Resilian, Stressan, Relaxan, Estrofactors, Oestroclear – for those with a history of stress/depression/anxiety/hormonal imbalances
*  Resist X, Chromium Plus, MetaPure EPA/DHA, Mitochondrial Complex – balances blood sugar and increases Mitochondrial Function…
*  Lipoic Acid, Glutathione, NCD, Oxidant Protection, non-acidic Vitamin C
We also see signs of exhaustion in a number of our clinical tests including Live Blood Screenings and Bio-impedance Analysis Screenings.
Call us to book an appointment (phone appointments or in-clinic appointments) on 3348 6098
Madonna Guy
Chief Clinician
New Leaf Natural Therapies
3348 6098
healthteam@newleafnaturaltherapies.com.au

LEAP Programme: Learning Enhancement Acupressure Programme as taught by Dr Charles Krebs

Wednesday, June 5th, 2013

Did you know??

Our LEAP Programme is for children (of any age haha) and adults who need their brains to function a little better.

For kids who get their letters mixed up, have comprehension issues (read but can’t make sense); where maths is difficult, where balance is off.  But, it’s never a quick fix.  The brain is complicated, and unfortunately in our modern world it’s taking longer to correct the brain than 10 years ago…  LEAP is a process, usually 10-20 sessions for a fairly ‘normal’ kid with learning problems/behavioural problems (usually brain disintegration causes behaviour), more if the child is severely stressed, toxic, allergic…

There are many reasons for brain disintegration – birthing stresses, birthing medications, vaccine toxins, lack of oxygen (in a specific neuronal pathway), mother stress, breastfeeding issues, birth of siblings, moving house, moving schools, allergies, candida, fungal infections, addictions, medications, teacher voices, teacher stresses, virus and viral particles and so much more!

Changes happen slowly but consistently on the programme as neurological pathways are working better and better.  Multi-sensory pathways support improvement with vision, hearing, sight, smell (such as anosmia), touch imbalances.  Primitive reflexes that are jammed that create excess fear, threats and dangers in life are slowly released.

Our initial LEAP Assessment with Norm is only $106.50 for 1.5 hours.  Find out if LEAP can help you and your family…

3348 6098

The healing journey with New Leaf

Saturday, March 2nd, 2013

Embarking on a health journey is a brave move to make. It means looking at the issues you may have avoided for a while and facing them head on. It’s a process that is often scary yet can also be richly rewarding. When you are the best version of yourself you can be, you can really shine and be there for those close to you.

It can be said that it’s a means of coming back to your basic self  – seeing your body as a precious temple and paying attention to what you really need. It’s treating yourself gently and gaining a greater connection to the whole of you – body and mind. As one of my favourite authors Sarah Avant Stover puts it – the only way out is in and through. To go through our health issues rather than going around them is the only real way to back to balance and health.

At New Leaf, we are committed to your success in this process. We know it’s yours, to go through in your way. Offering a harmonious range of therapies, we seek to find the real cause of your health issues and guide you back to balance and health.

We see your journey to optimal health as a partnership between yourself and us. Thus, we have a few suggestions for you in order that you get the best results from your treatment with us:

  • Eat a fresh, wholefoods diet. When you eat fresh, vital food, you feel just that. Everything we eat nourishes our cells. If we consider that the body is really the only vessel we have to take us through this lifetime, it makes sense to nourish it with the best food possible.
  • Drink a minimum of 2 litres of pure filtered water daily. Besides hydration, there are countless benefits of drinking adequate pure water. Improved energy, detoxification, digestion, skin condition and weight loss are just a few.
  • Limit caffeine, or better still, cut it altogether. Caffeine creates extra work for your liver, and can place stress on the adrenal glands and nervous system. It also promotes dehydration and in the long term, fatigue. There are many delicious herbal teas and coffee alternatives available in supermarkets and health food stores.
  • Sleep 8 hours a night. While sleeping as little as possible in modern society is often considered admirable behaviour, the truth is, it promotes premature aging, weight gain, can increase stress and complicate many other health issues. It may require changing your usual routine a little, but getting 8 hours of quality sleep a night is an investment in your health.
  • Spend a few minutes a day alone, doing some quiet breath awareness in a comfortable seated position. All you need do is focus on your breath with your eyes closed. This can have wonderfully beneficial effects on your nervous system, improving mood, reducing stress and creating calm. A calm body heals well!
  • Increase body movement. This means different things to different people. Start with where you are at in terms of your current physical fitness, and do what feels right for you. Even if it just means adding incidental exercise by taking the stairs instead of the lift, walking to a colleague’s desk rather than emailing, or taking a short walk before or after work. Start where you are at the moment and build gently from there.

These are simple steps you can take today to improve your body’s ability to balance and heal. You can do one at a time, a few, or all of them, whatever feels right and good for you. It’s up to you.

We look forward to supporting you in achieving a state of greater health.

Q. First Few Days on HCG: Madonna’s comments

Wednesday, November 14th, 2012
From an HCGer…
Hi, I am on day 5 (including 2 loading days) and have lost 2kgs, however today I have a bad headache and am really hungry. I have just taken some panadol but am struggling today. My loading days I ate HEAPS but was thinking the whole time I wasn’t hungry and wasn’t craving anything. Now of course every time I turn on the TV there is a food as and I want it!!
Madonna’s Comments:
1. Headaches are due to detoxification… the body is releasing toxins from the fat tissue, and our body is struggling dealing with it. Drink heaps and heaps of purified water.  In our clinic we have infrared saunas (an hour is recommended on HCG), kinesiology protocols that support detoxification, raindrop technique (essential oil technique), and energetic healings, all of which support the body’s lymphatic system and major organs to eliminate toxins faster.  Lipoic Acid (4 daily available at New Leaf) is both a fat soluble and water soluble anti-oxidant – in other words it sops up toxins from both the blood and the fat tissue.  It’s fantastic for HCG.  It also helps with blood sugar balancing which can be a major cause of headaches on HCG.
2. Hunger: homeopathic drops take different amounts of time for different people to kick in. It’s only day 3 on the VLCD, some people take up to day 5 before homeopathic drops kick in. Make sure the drops are away from eating, drinking, coffee, cleaning teeth, and keep away from electrical appliances.  We use products such as Resist X to settle down the hunger – drink heaps of filtered water, gymnema settles hunger and sugar cravings, chromium helps to create energy within the cells – there’s lots we can do for hunger!
3. Panadol: do the best you can, but obviously your adding another toxin to the body which will have to be dealt with.  Hopefully it will only be the first few days for these headaches – let’s us know whats stored in our fat tissue doesn’t it??
4. Have a treatment with Norm or Kat and start balancing the hormones – getting them to kick the hypothalamus into action might be a possibility from the kinesiology perspective as well. Kinesiology can re-connect the hypothalamus with many parts of the body so that it speeds up the process of supporting HCG to kick in as quickly as possible.
5. Resist X: 2 tabs 3-4 x daily – if you need it, it increases cellular energy, gets the sugar activated properly within the cells (supports insulin resistance) – great for hunger on HCG.  One of my favourite supplements for clients on HCG.
6. Kinesiology for food sabotage… can also be used to help your brain and body settle down into the hcg process..  HCG is a process that helps to re-frame our food tendencies, and helps us deal with sabotages, bad eating habits, munchies…things that we may not even be aware that we’re doing!  Kinesiology, energetic healings, reiki, raindrop technique all help to settle our nervous system down.
7. Raindrop Technique: essential oil technique performed by Rachel that kicks the nervous system into action.  Gives energy.  Settles the adrenals and cortisol levels so that hunger may be normalised.  Good luck!!!  Total bliss, either an hour of Raindrops Technique or 1.5 hours of Raindrop/Reiki combination.
HCG Brisbane
Madonna Guy ND
3348 6098