Archive for the ‘Raynaud’s Syndrome’ Category

Far Infrared Sauna Therapy: detox at New Leaf Wynnum!

Tuesday, March 24th, 2015

We love our Far Infrared Sauna at New Leaf…. Book into your own private room and enjoy the process 🙂

Save $$$ by buying a 10 pack at New Leaf!!!  3348 6098
healthteam@newleafnaturaltherapies.com.au

Far Infrared Sauna Therapy (F.I.R.S.T.)

Far Infrared (F.I.R.) is a form of radiant heat that gently heats objects directly without heating the surrounding air, like traditional saunas.  Traditional saunas use steam and hot air to heat up the external environment whereas the F.I.R. Saunas heat is a softer and gentler penetrating the skin upto 4 cm in depth thus having an effect on the deep skin layers. As a result blood circulation is increased to the skin cells and increasing repair of damaged capillaries. With an increase of blood supply to the area there is an increase of oxygen and nutrients delivered to the cells and waste products from the cells are carried out creating an overall improvement of skin cell function.

F.I.R. Saunas also has positive results with skin conditions such as acne, psoriasis, eczema and general lumps and bumps. The increase in circulation helps to clear blocked pores, release the deeply embedded unwanted debris and infection. Thus as a consequence the sebaceous glands shrink as the skin system is working more efficiently.

F.I.R. Saunas activates adenosine triphosphate (ATP) in the skin cells. ATP is the major source of energy for each cell to function. Therefore the more ATP each cell makes allows for the uptake of nutrients and dumping of the waste products out for clearing faster and more effectively. That is, ATP fuels processes within the cells that kill bacteria. Combined with the increase of circulation supports skin repair and recovery from skin disorders such as acne, cystic acne, boils, skin infections and rough dull skin.

F.I.R. Saunas also assist detoxification processes around the body. the toxins in the blood which are usually processed by the liver or kidneys are released through the sweat and out of the body by the increase of circulation. This decreases the impact on the kidneys and liver which frees them up to bereplenished (particularly the liver as it can regenerate itself).

Furthermore F.I.R. Saunas support immunity. With the increase in circulation the body is heated up thus creating an artificial fever which in turn promotes a natural healing response and helps the body to combat any viral or bacterial infections.

In combination with massage F.I.R. Saunas can be beneficial for both detoxification and deep tissue massage. That is, a massage followed by a F.I.R. Saunas will further to support he detoxification processes which have started in the massage. Where is a F.I.R. Saunas followed by a massage will increase the circulation thus allowing the depth of the massage to be more thorough.

What is the Role of Th1 and Th2 cells in Autoimmune Disease?

Thursday, September 19th, 2013

by 3 Comments

What is the Role of Th1 and Th2 in Autoimmune Disease?

This article was originally written as a guest post for The Paleo Mom: 

FROM NEW LEAF:  This is a fantastically written article about T Helper 1 & 2 cells and how Auto-Immune is linked, which disorders are considered T Helper 1 or 2 dominant.  All of which we treat at New Leaf Natural Therapies. 

Those that suffer from autoimmune disease commonly experience symptoms that stem from imbalances within the functioning of their immune system. There are many factors that can influence this balance – stress, nutrition, vitamin and mineral deficiencies, gut flora, and allergies, among others. This way of looking at autoimmune disease is a growing trend in the alternative field, highlighted through the work of Datis Kharrazian.

What are Th1 and Th2?

T-helper cells (abbreviated as Th) are a vital part of the immune system. They are lymphocytes (types of white blood cells) that recognize foreign pathogens, or in the case of autoimmune disease, normal tissue. In response to this recognition, they produce cytokines, which are hormonal messenger proteins that are responsible for the biological effects of the immune system. They are divided into subgroups as follows:

Th1: Th1 cells are involved in what is called “cell-mediated” immunity, which usually deals with infections by viruses and certain bacteria. They are the body’s first line of defense against pathogens that get inside our cells. They tend to be pro-inflammatory and are involved in the development of organ-specific autoimmune disease.

Th2: Th2 cells are involved in what is called “humoral-mediated” immunity, which deals with bacteria, toxins, and allergens. They are responsible for stimulating the production of antibodies in response to extracellular pathogens (those found in blood or other body fluids). They tend not to be inflammatory and are involved in systemic autoimmune disease and other chronic conditions.

In a well-functioning immune system, both groups of these T helper cells work together to keep the system balanced. One side might become more active to eradicate a threat, then settling back to a balanced level.

How does this affect autoimmune disease?

In some people with autoimmune disease, patterns showing a dominance to either the Th1 or Th2 pathway have been shown. Although there are exceptions, the following table shows the conditions that are most commonly associated with a Th1 or Th2 dominant state:

TH1 dominant conditions:

Type I diabetes Multiple sclerosis Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis Grave’s Disease Crohn’s Disease Psoriasis Sjoren’s Syndrome Celiac Disease Lichen Planus Rheumatoid Arthritis Chronic viral infections

TH2 dominant conditions: 

Lupus Allergic Dermatitis Scleroderma Atopic Eczema Sinusitis Inflammatory Bowel Disease Asthma Allergies Cancer Ulcerative Colitis Multiple chemical sensitivity

When the th1 cells of the immune system are overactive, they can suppress the activity of th2 and vice versa. This can be problematic because these two components of the immune system function in a delicately balanced relationship. In the case of autoimmune disease, imbalance can further the attack on healthy tissue, thereby worsening symptoms.

Although research can lump those with certain conditions under the Th1/2 categories, in reality they can be all over the map. For instance, although most Hashimoto’s patients present a Th1 dominance, some can be Th2. It is also possible to have both Th1 and Th2 simultaneously overactive or under-active. Pregnancy can shift the immune system temporarily to Th2, which is why a lot of women find out they have Hashimoto’s after they give birth and their immune system returns to Th1 dominance.

How do I find out if I am Th1 or Th2 dominant?

AT New Leaf we provide Live Blood Screenings from which we do a white blood cell count – the count of neutrophils, lymphocytes and monocytes, along with eosinophils, let us know a huge amount about your immune system.

There are effective treatments, supplements, processes we use that can help to start the process of regulating your immune system.

Ask about:

  • kinesiology for the immune system (NOT)
  • kinesiology for finding out if your body is recognising foods, supplements, viruses, bacteria
  • live blood screenings
  • remedial massage and microcurrent for pain

3348 6098

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