Nutrition and psychiatry!

March 22nd, 2018

Great article from the UK about nutrients and psychiatric conditions!  Obviously we treat all of these conditions at New Leaf – our combination of:

kinesiology
naturopathy
universal consciousness
acupuncture
chi nei tsang
microcurrent therapy
nutritional supplementation

gives great support and relief and hope… for our clientele.

Call us on 3348 6098 for support 🙂

 

A lack of essential nutrients is known to contribute to the onset of poor mental health in people suffering from anxiety and depression, bipolar disorder, schizophrenia and ADHD. Nutritional psychiatry is a growing discipline that focuses on the use of food and supplements to provide these essential nutrients as part of an integrated or alternative treatment for mental health disorders.

But nutritional approaches for these debilitating conditions are not widely accepted by mainstream medicine. Treatment options tend to be limited to official National Institute for Care Excellence (NICE) guidelines which recommend talking therapies and antidepressants.

Use of antidepressants

Antidepressant use has more than doubled in recent years. In England 64.7m prescriptions were issued for antidepressants in 2016 at a cost of ÂŁ266.6m. This is an increase of 3.7m on the number of items prescribed in 2015 and more than double than the 31m issued in 2006.

A recent Oxford University study found that antidepressants were more effective in treating depression than placebo. The study was led by Dr Andrea Cipriani who claimed that depression is under treated. Cipriani maintains that antidepressants are effective and a further 1m prescriptions should be issued to people in the UK.

This approach suggests that poor mental health caused by social conditions is viewed as easily treated by simply dispensing drugs. But antidepressants are shunned by people whom they could help because of the social stigma associated with mental ill-health which leads to discrimination and exclusion.

Prescriptions for 64.7m items of antidepressants were dispensed in England in 2016, the highest level recorded by the NHS. Shutterstock

More worrying is the increase in the use of antidepressants by children and young people. In Scotland, 5,572 children under 18 were prescribed antidepressants for anxiety and depression in 2016. This figure has more than doubled since 2009/2010.

But according to British psychopharmacologist Professor David Healy, 29 clinical trials of antidepressant use in young people found no benefits at all. These trials revealed that instead of relieving symptoms of anxiety and depression, antidepressants caused children and young people to feel suicidal.

Healy also challenges their safety and effectiveness in adults. He believes that antidepressants are over-prescribed and that there is little evidence that they are safe for long-term use. Antidepressants are said to create dependency, have unpleasant side effects and cannot be relied upon to always relieve symptoms.

Nutrition and poor mental health

In developed countries such as the UK we eat a greater variety of foodstuffs than ever before – but it doesn’t follow that we are well nourished. In fact, many people do not eat enough nutrients that are essential for good brain health, opting for a diet of heavily processed food containing artificial additives and sugar.

The link between poor mental health and nutritional deficiencies has long been recognised by nutritionists working in the complementary health sector. However, psychiatrists are only now becoming increasingly aware of the benefits of using nutritional approaches to mental health, calling for their peers to support and research this new field of treatment.

It is now known that many mental health conditions are caused by inflammation in the brain which ultimately causes our brain cells to die. This inflammatory response starts in our gut and is associated with a lack of nutrients from our food such as magnesium, omega-3 fatty acids, probiotics, vitamins and minerals that are all essential for the optimum functioning of our bodies.

Recent research has shown that food supplements such as zinc, magnesium, omega 3, and vitamins B and D3 can help improve people’s mood, relieve anxiety and depression and improve the mental capacity of people with Alzheimer’s.

Magnesium is one of most important minerals for optimal health, yet many people are lacking in it. One study found that a daily magnesium citrate supplement led to a significant improvement in depression and anxiety, regardless of age, gender or severity of depression. Improvement did not continue when the supplement was stopped.

Omega-3 fatty acids are another nutrient that is critical for the development and function of the central nervous system – and a lack has been associated with low mood, cognitive decline and poor comprehension.

Research has shown that supplements like zinc, magnesium and vitamins B and D can improve the mental capacity of people with Alzheimer’s. Shutterstock

The role of probiotics – the beneficial live bacteria in your digestive system – in improving mental health has also been explored by psychiatrists and nutritionists, who found that taking them daily was associated with a significant reduction in depression and anxiety. Vitamin B complex and zinc are other supplements found to reduce the symptoms of anxiety and depression.

Hope for the future?

These over-the-counter” supplements are widely available in supermarkets, chemists and online health food stores, although the cost and quality may vary. For people who have not responded to prescription drugs or who cannot tolerate the side effects, nutritional intervention can offer hope for the future.

There is currently much debate over the effectiveness of antidepressants. The use of food supplements offer an alternative approach that has the potential to make a significant difference to the mental health of all age groups.

The emerging scientific evidence suggests that there should be a bigger role for nutritional psychiatry in mental health within conventional health services. If the burden of mental ill health is to be reduced, GPs and psychiatrists need to be aware of the connection between food, inflammation and mental illness.

Medical education has traditionally excluded nutritional knowledge and its association with disease. This has led to a situation where very few doctors in the UK have a proper understanding of the importance of nutrition. Nutritional interventions are thought to have little evidence to support their use to prevent or maintain well-being and so are left to dietitians, rather than doctors, to advise on.

But as the evidence mounts up, it is time for medical education to take nutrition seriously so that GPs and psychiatrists of the future know as much about its role in good health as they do about anatomy and physiology. The state of our mental health could depend on it.

Lymphatic Drainage at New Leaf Natural Therapies

January 31st, 2018

Lymphatic drainage is a therapeutic massage treatment. The massage uses very light pressure and long, gentle, rhythmic strokes to increase the flow of lymph and reduce toxins in your body.

The lymph system is part of your body’s immune system and helps fight infection. Lymph itself is a clear, slightly yellow fluid. It transports nutrients and oxygen to cells, collecting toxins on the way and flushing them out through the lymph nodes. You have around twice as many lymph vessels as blood vessels in your body. However, unlike blood, which is pumped around by your heart, the lymph system has no pump. The pressure from your blood vessels and movement from your muscles push the lymphatic fluid around.

New Leaf Natural Therapies Lymphatic Drainage Remedial Massage

What is lymphatic drainage massage good for?

Lymphatic drainage massage can have a beneficial effect on your general health. Because lymph is key to keeping your immune system working properly, improving the flow and drainage of lymph around the body is good for you in lots of ways.

Lymphatic drainage can:

  • reduce the chance of you suffering from minor colds and viruses; it helps your body fight off infection, and speeds up healing and recovery from illness
  • help reduce water retention; for instance, because the lymph system has no pump, if you sit for a long time without moving, the lymph can’t flow easily — this is why you may experience swollen feet or fingers
  • boost weight loss, as improving the lymphatic system will improve your metabolic rate, which helps you burn calories more efficiently.

Manual lymphatic drainage is also used in the treatment of lymphoedema.

Lymphatic drainage massage can improve your skin texture by:

  • reducing swelling, puffiness and blotches
  • giving you clean, healthy pores
  • speeding up healing in scar tissue, so it may, for example, improve the appearance of stretch marks
  • helping to reduce cellulite; the massage increases blood flow and circulation to the affected areas, which helps the body break down the toxins which cause dimply skin.

Always tell your therapist in advance if you are, or think you might be, pregnant, have any medical conditions or are receiving any treatment or medication, have recently had an operation, or are allergic to anything.

What to expect from lymphatic drainage massage

As with any spa treatment, you will get most benefit if you give yourself enough time to relax and enjoy your massage. Arrive soon enough to get ready and settle; try to avoid rushing off straight afterwards.

Lymphatic drainage massage usually takes place in a heated room; warmth is an important factor in increasing lymphatic flow. You are also likely to be more relaxed if you’re not cold. Your therapist will usually carry out lymphatic drainage massage with you on a massage table, while you’re draped in discreetly placed towels.

Your therapist will probably work her way up from your feet. Lymphatic drainage massage uses very light pressure, as well as long, gentle, rhythmic strokes and soft pumping movements in the direction of the lymph nodes. The main lymph nodes are in the neck, armpits, and groin.

Lymphatic drainage can leave you feeling exhausted. You may want to have a lie down, or at the very least, a very undemanding schedule for the rest of the day. Give your body time to ease back into activity.

Lymphatic drainage massage may also leave you really thirsty. We’ve seen people who are not usually water-drinkers reaching for bottles of San Pellegrino like it’s free champagne!

Hot tip!

Lymphatic drainage is about flushing out your system; you can do this every day by drinking plenty of water.

One of the best things you can do for your lymphatic system is to be more active. Even the most gentle activity will help encourage a healthy lymph flow, as movement of the muscles exerts pressure on the lymphatic vessels and keeps them moving.

Supplements for the Lymphatics!

Vitamin C – is both a fat-soluble and water-soluble anti-oxidant:   supports detoxification of both the blood/lymph and fat tissue

G-Tox:  Is a powdered supplements that supports alkalising the building; building the environment in the gut for good immunity; cleanses the lymphatic system in the gut; and supports better kidney function.

Lymphatox:  is a supplements where the tablets support better fluid and lymphatic detoxiciation in our bodies.

Individual Herbal Tonics:  there are many herbs that work for better lymphatic drainage – Madonna and Georgia can help you find a combination that works for your body.

 

Call us on 3348 6098 for appointments!
You Tube:  New Leaf Health Team
healthteam@newleafnaturaltherapies.com.au

How Addictions Get Stuck in Your Brain!

January 19th, 2018
(Sharing this fabulous article…Thanks!)
At New Leaf we use kinesiology and Universal Consciousness guided meditations, along with nutritional supplements (which improve the neurotransmitters below); LEAP Brain integration and stress diffusion techniques to support better control over addictions.  Kinesiology and Universal Consciousness healings support better frontal cortex (problem solving) activity, so that the addictive centres don’t take hold as quickly…
Madonna Guy
07 3348 6098
YouTubeChannel:  New Leaf Health Team

How Addictions Get Stuck in Your Brain

Why are some people who overdo it with alcohol, food, sex, or other things, able to remember the consequences of their actions, learn from their mistakes, and avoid repeating the behaviour? And why do others minimize the consequences, maximize the pleasure they got from the activity, and continue to engage in the same destructive behaviour?

The answer lies in the way your brain is wired.

Why Am I A Slave to These Cravings? Understanding the Brain’s Reward System

Whether you experience consequences and quit the bad behaviour or keep repeating it depends in large part on the biological makeup of your brain and your brain’s reward system. What is the brain’s reward system? It is an intricate network of brain systems and neurotransmitters that are critical to human survival. It drives us to seek out the things we need to stay alive and carry on the human race.

Many other things that are not necessarily crucial to our survival also activate the reward system:

  1. Listening to music
  2. Taking a warm bath
  3. Looking at a beautiful painting

Then there are substances and behaviours that are actually detrimental to our health and well-being that cause the reward system to kick into high gear such as:

  1. Cocaine
  2. Methamphetamines
  3. Heroin
  4. Alcohol
  5. Caramel fudge brownies
    Playing video games
  6. Excessive texting and gambling

Let’s take a closer look at the neurotransmitters and brain systems involved in the reward system so you can see how it works and how it gets out of whack. First, let’s examine the role played by four neurotransmitters. Neurotransmitters act as the brain’s messengers, relaying information within the brain. The strength or weakness of each of these neurotransmitters plays an important role in your ability to stop engaging in bad behaviours or in driving you to addiction.

BRAIN CHEMICALS INVOLVED WITH CRAVINGS AND SELF-CONTROL

Dopamine—motivation, saliency, drive, stimulant
Serotonin—happy, anti-worry, calming
GABA—inhibitory, calms, relaxes
Endorphins—pleasure and pain-killing properties

  • Dopamine is a feel-good chemical. Whenever we do something enjoyable, it’s like pressing a button in the brain to release a little bit of dopamine to make us feel pleasure. Cocaine, methamphetamines, alcohol, and nicotine all cause dopamine surges that make these substances highly desirable—sometimes even more desirable than the things we need to survive like food, water, and sex. The amount of dopamine released when drugs are taken can be two to ten times more than what your brain produces for natural rewards.
  • Serotonin is thought of as the happy, anti-worry, flexibility chemical. Many of the current antidepressants work on this neurotransmitter. When serotonin levels are low, people tend to be worried, rigid, inflexible, oppositional and argumentative, and suffer from anxiety, depression, obsessive thinking, or compulsive behaviours. Simple carbohydrates increase l-tryptophan in the brain, which is why some people can get hooked on cookies, bread, potatoes, and sugar.
  • GABA, or gamma-aminobutyric acid, is an inhibitory neurotransmitter that calms or helps to relax the brain. If you have suffered an emotional trauma or you are under a lot of stress, GABA may be depleted and your emotional or limbic brain may become excessively active, making you feel anxious, uptight, or sad. This makes you eat or drink in an attempt to calm your limbic brain.
  • Endorphins are the brain’s own natural pleasure and pain-killing chemicals. They are the body’s own natural morphine or heroin-like substances. These substances are heavily involved in addiction and the loss of control.

Why Can’t I Just Say No? The Brain’s Self-Control Circuit

The brain systems that drive you to seek out things that bring you pleasure and the prefrontal cortex (PFC), which puts on the brakes when you are about to engage in risky behaviour, work in concert to create your self-control circuit. In a healthy self-control circuit, an effective PFC provides impulse control and good judgment while the deep limbic system offers an adequate dose of motivation so you can plan and follow through on your goals. You can say no to alcohol, hot fudge sundaes, cigarettes, gambling, sex fetishes, and many other bad behaviours.

In the addicted brain, the PFC is diminished and the drive circuits take control. When the PFC is underactive, it can create an imbalance in the reward system and cause you to lose control over your behaviour. When this is the case you are more likely to fall victim to your cravings. Having low activity often results in a tendency for impulse-control problems and poor internal supervision.

Challenges on HCG…

January 12th, 2018
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OpZaW2HWlV0&t=297s
2.9 kilos down to far this week on HCG (6 kilos to go on this round). Hubby – 600g just eating well with a little exercise. Interesting.   I’ve done my VLA’s a few times (since I can and I have the machine) and it is mostly fat at this stage – not fluid.  But the weight loss, of course, settles down as we get into the deeper, harder packed fat which we lay down with stress, binge eating, dehydration…
 
Why HCG?
* eliminates fat cells (if done correctly)
* re-establishes hormonal function
* maintains muscle mass (we do VLA BioImpedance Screenings) – occasionally someone drinks heaps of diet drinks during HCG – that SLOWS metabolism, EATS your muscle mass, REDUCES your muscle quality. Be wary!!
* It works!
 
Without naturopathic testing we don’t know what’s going on. Trust your body. Chat to us about the best testing combination for you…
 
Go the HCG!!

Let’s chat dementia!

January 12th, 2018

5 Exercises That Inhibit Primitive Reflexes

November 30th, 2017

So excited to share Dr Melillo’s exercises….  By the way…  have you seen my video on doing the Moro Reflex on our YouTube channel?  We’ve been treating kids with primitive reflexes that are jammed for nearly 15 years.  Does this feel like you could benefit from these exercises?

Madonna Guy ND
3348 6098 / 0417 643 849 / healthteam@newleafnaturaltherapies.com.au

 

 

5 Exercises That Inhibit Primitive Reflexes

In Health News

Through an extensive research survey, we have demonstrated the relationship between the retention of infant reflexes and a wide range of neuro-developmental disorders like autism and ADHD. These retained primitive reflexes can have long term effects on cognitive development even into adulthood. Once your child has been assessed for primitive reflex retention, targeted therapeutic interventions are available to improve neurological development. However the first step to the program is to inhibit any retained primitive reflexes found.

The way to get rid of primitive reflexes is to use them. The following reintegration exercises are provided for the reflexes that are most consistently associated with a brain imbalance. These exercises can help start the process of balancing the brain so that your child can overcome developmental delays. These exercises can also be done by adults and parents, of whom as many as 40% may also have retained primitive reflexes.  Rest assured that this initial step in remediation is easy and does not take long. However, 20 plus years of experience has shown that if we use a hemispheric integration program, like The Brain Balance Program along with these exercises, these reflexes are inhibited much more quickly.

Face Stroking for Root and Suck Reflex

Root and Suck Reflex Integration ExerciseStroke the childs face until the reflex stops, which usually takes five to six times in a row. Do this at least twice a day until you can no longer elicit the reflex. Chewing gum can also be helpful to inhibit this reflex.
 

 

 


Starfish for Moro Reflex

Moro Reflex Integration Exercise - Starfish ExerciseHave your child sit in a chair in a fetal position, with the right wrist crossed over the left and the right ankle crossed over the left ankle. Fists should be closed. Ask your child to inhale and make like a starfish by swinging his arms up and out and thrusting his legs out while extending the head back and opening hands. Have him hold this position for 5 to 7 seconds while holding his breath. Then tell him to exhale and return to the same position, crossing the left wrist and ankle over the right wrist and ankle. Repeat this again until they are back to the original position Do this 6 times in a row a few times a day until the reflex is inhibited fully.

 


Snow Angels for Galant Reflex

Snow Angels Exercise for Galant Reflex IntegrationHave your child lie face-up on a mat or flat surface with his legs extended and arms at the sides. have him breathe in an simultaneously spread his legs outward and raise his arms out along the flour and overhead, with the hands touching. The hands should touch at the same time the legs are fully extended. Exhale and return to the original position. The key is to get the child to move all four limbs slowly at the same time. Do this 5 times several times a day until you can no longer elicit the reflex.

 

 


Ball Squeezes for Palmer Grasp Reflex

Grasping Reflex Integration ExerciseHave child squeeze a small ball, such as a tennis ball, several times in a row. Or you can just stroke the palm of the hand with a light brush until the reflex is suppressed.

 


Fencer Exercise for Asymmetric Tonic Neck Reflex

ATNR Reflex Integration Exercise | Fencer ExerciseThis one may take some practice to get right, so be patient. Have your child sit in a chair and turn his head to both sides or to the one side that still elicits the reflex. As your child is turning his head, have him extend the foot and arm of the same side outward from the body and look at his hand. The opposite hand should also open, the arm should flex, and the other leg should bend. Have the child return to starting position and repeat until the reflex fatigues. Repeat three times in a row.

 


Key Things to Remember

  • Exercises should be repeated in succession 5 to 10 times until the reflex fatigues.
  • Frequency is more important than intensity.
  • Movement must be slow and purposeful.
  • Proper mind-set is crucial: stay motivated and positive!
  • Give it time.

Why lose weight? Is the obesity epidemic REALLY a problem?

November 22nd, 2017

You hear about it in the news a lot: the obesity epidemic.  Australia and the United States seem to alternate year to year with who is the most obese nation – but we’re never far from the top!

What exactly does this mean? Obesity is defined as having a body mass index (BMI) of 30 or higher. Just so you can visualise: a 1.65m person becomes obese at 82kg. A BMI of 25-29 puts you in the “overweight” category. We do accurate BMI BioImpedance Screenings at New Leaf so that people know EXACTLY where they stand, but also look at fat mass, muscle mass, muscle quality and hydration – all of which can impact on your BMI and general health.

But is obesity really so bad? The resounding answer is “Yes!” In case you need convincing, here are 10 sobering reasons to lose weight:
1. Heart Disease

Excess fat, especially at your waist, raises triglyceride and bad cholesterol levels, lowers good cholesterol, increases blood pressure and damages your blood vessel system — all of which put you at greater risk for cardiovascular disease, heart attack and stroke.

2. Cancer

Obesity is linked to increased risk of cancers of the oesophagus, breast (postmenopausal), endometrium (the lining of the uterus), colon, rectum, kidney, pancreas, thyroid and gallbladder, and possibly other types of cancer as well, according to the National Cancer Institute.

3. Diabetes

The most common form of diabetes, Type 2, develops most often in middle-aged men and women who are overweight or obese — especially when those excess kilos manifest as belly fat. But adults aren’t the only ones at risk. Type 2 diabetes is becoming more common among overweight and obese children and teens as well.

4. Heartburn

Norwegian researchers have found that gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) has increased by almost 50% in only 10 years. The reason? The rise in obesity. “Increased weight — especially abdominal obesity — increases the pressure over the lower esophageal sphincter, which is the closure mechanism between the stomach and esophagus,” explains study author Dr. Eivind Ness-Jensen, senior resident in internal medicine and gastroenterology at Levanger Hospital in Norway. “The pressure forces the sphincter to open more frequently and for longer durations, promoting reflux of acidic content from the stomach to the esophagus.”

5. Immunity and Influenza

As rates of obesity continue to rise, the number of deaths from the flu could rise too. Recent research from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill shows that obesity is associated with an impaired immune response to the influenza vaccination.

6. Depression

Obesity in women is linked to a 37% increase in major depression, and the two conditions often trigger and influence each other. Heavy women also have more frequent thoughts of suicide, according to the American Psychological Association.

7. Disability

No surprise here. Carrying around excess weight puts a lot more stress on your skeleton and limits mobility. According to the CDC, people with arthritis are more likely to be obese. What’s more, Americans over the age 50 will collectively lose the equivalent of 86 million healthy years of life due to the combination of obesity and knee arthritis, say researchers at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston. And scientists at the University of New Hampshire found that overweight and obese women had an average of 24% less leg strength and 20% slower walking speed than normal-weight study participants.

8. Gum Disease

Too much body fat can even affect your oral health, putting you at higher risk for periodontal disease, according to a recent study conducted at the University of North Carolina School of Dentistry.

9. Infertility, Gestational Diabetes and Birth Defects

Heavy women experience more miscarriages and pregnancy complications (such as gestational diabetes and preeclampsia) and are more likely to give birth to babies with birth defects. In addition, obesity can lower the success rate of in vitro fertilization (IVF). A man’s fertility suffers too: Obesity is associated with low sperm motility and altered testosterone levels.

10. Quality of Life

Chronic disease, disability, depression and other health problems all chip away at joie de vivre and longevity. According to research in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine, obesity significantly reduces “quality adjusted life years,” due to poor health and premature death caused by excess weight.
And if individual health woes don’t provide enough reasons to lose weight, consider the fact that obesity can have a tremendous impact on the wallet as well. According to a new study from Cornell University, obesity now accounts for almost 21% of all US health care costs, and Australia usually follows the U.S. trends.  In fact, obesity now adds more to health care costs than smoking cigarettes.
So if you’ve been ignoring those extra kilos, it’s time to open your eyes. The best reasons to lose weight are simple: long life, good physical health and emotional well-being. And a little extra financial security doesn’t hurt, either.

What are the differences between Live and Killed Vaccines?

November 2nd, 2017

I was chatting to a client this week about vaccinations – and she was under the impression that all vaccines contained ‘dead’ viruses or bacteria.  Here’s a great article I found on which vaccines contain what – and what to look out for…

What are the differences between live and “killed” vaccines? What do you need to know about shedding if you receive a live vaccine? Could these vaccines be dangerous to those who have not received immunizations or are immunocompromised (for example, due to chemotherapy)? What precautions should you take in special circumstances?
Live vs. Inactivated Vaccines
Live vaccines contain a weakened or attenuated form of a virus or bacteria.

This is, in contrast, to “killed” or inactivated vaccines. It might sound frightening at first to realize that a vaccine contains a weakened virus or bacteria, but these are altered so that they cannot cause disease—at least in people with healthy immune systems (and by far the majority of people without a healthy immune system as well.)
If a child (or adult) has a suppressed immune system, live vaccines are not given. Where this could potentially be a problem is with shedding. After receiving the vaccine, some of the weakened viruses will travel through the body and can be present in bodily secretions such as feces.
The other main type of vaccine is made of the inactivated virus or bacteria (whole vaccine) or just parts of the virus or bacteria (fractional vaccine).
Advantages and Benefits of Live Vaccines
Live vaccines are thought to better simulate natural infections and usually provide lifelong protection with one or two doses.

A second dose, like for the MMR vaccine, is given because some people don’t respond to the first—not as a booster dose.
Most inactivated vaccines, in contrast, require multiple primary doses and boosters to get the same type of immunity.
Live Vaccines
Children have been getting live vaccines for many years, and these vaccines are considered to be very safe for those who are healthy.

In fact, one of the very first vaccines, the smallpox vaccine, was a live-virus vaccine. Due to widespread vaccination, the last natural case of smallpox occurred in 1977 (there was a case due to a laboratory accident in 1978) and the disease was declared to be eradicated worldwide in 1979.
Examples of Live Vaccines
Live vaccines include:
MMR – The combination measles, mumps, and rubella vaccine.
Vavivax – The varicella or chicken pox vaccine.
Proquad – A combination of MMR and Varivax.
Rotavirus vaccines – Rotavirus vaccines are a combination of two oral vaccines, RotaTeq and Rotarix.
Flumist – The nasal spray flu vaccine (Note: In contrast, the flu shot is an inactivated vaccine.)
Yellow fever vaccine – The yellow fever vaccine is an attenuated, live virus vaccine recommended for travelers to high-risk areas.
Adenovirus vaccine – A live-virus vaccine, the adenovirus vaccine protects against type 4 and type 7 adenovirus. It is only approved for military personnel.
Typhoid vaccine – The oral typhoid vaccine is made with a live-attenuated strain of Salmonella typhi, the bacteria which causes typhoid fever. An inactivated, injectable version of the vaccine is also available. Either typhoid vaccine would only be given to travelers to high-risk areas.

BCG – The bacilli Calmette-Guerin tuberculosis vaccine is not routinely used in the United States because it mainly prevents severe TB, a disease uncommon in the United States.
Smallpox vaccine – The smallpox vaccine has not been routinely used since 1972 but is available from stockpiles if it is needed.
Oral polio vaccine – The original OPV (Sabin vaccine), which has been replaced in the United States by the inactivated polio vaccine (Salk vaccine.) Prior to using the injectable polio vaccine, there were a few cases of polio each year in the United States felt to be due to the vaccine.
The only live virus vaccines that are used routinely include the MMR, Varivax, Rotavirus, and Flumist (the injectable flu shot is preferred for those who are high risk.)
Live Vaccine Precautions
Although live vaccines don’t cause disease in the people who get them because they are made with weakened viruses and bacteria, there is always a concern that someone with a severely weakened immune system could get sick after getting a live vaccine. That is why live vaccines are not given to people who are getting chemotherapy or who have severe HIV among other conditions.
Whether or not you give a live vaccine to someone who has a problem with their immune system depends greatly on exactly what condition they have and the degree of their immunosuppression. For example, it is now recommended that children with HIV get the MMR, Varivax, and rotavirus vaccines, depending on their CD4+ T-lymphocyte counts.
What about taking precautions so that you don’t expose other people after your child has a live vaccine?
Vaccine Shedding and Live Vaccines
Parents sometimes have a concern about whether their healthy children should get live vaccines if they will be exposed to someone else who has a problem with their immune system, especially if they are in close contact with someone that has compromised immunity.
Fortunately, except for OPV and smallpox, which aren’t typically used anymore, children who live with someone who has an immunologic deficiency can and should get most vaccines in the routine childhood immunization schedule, such as MMR, Varivax, and the rotavirus vaccines. That’s because it would be extremely rare for someone to contract one of these viruses from someone who got the vaccine. A much greater concern, actually, would be that the unvaccinated child might get a natural infection with measles or chicken pox, and pass that on to the person with an immune system problem.
In fact, the latest guidelines from the Immune Deficiency Foundation state that:

Close contacts of patients with compromised immunity should not receive live oral poliovirus vaccine because they might shed the virus and infect a patient with compromised immunity. Close contacts can receive other standard vaccines because viral shedding is unlikely and these pose little risk of infection to a subject with compromised immunity.
Unless they will be in contact with someone who is severely immunosuppressed, such as getting a stem cell transplant and being in a protective environment, they can even get the live, nasal spray flu vaccine.
The concern in any of these cases is viral shedding, in which someone becomes contagious and can pass a virus to someone else. When we get sick with a cold, the flu, a cold sore, or any other contagious disease, it is not uncommon that we spread it to other people by shedding the virus or bacteria that is making us sick.
With true vaccine shedding, like with the oral polio vaccine, the vaccine virus can be shed after being vaccinated even though you didn’t get sick with the virus. Fortunately, when most others are exposed to vaccine virus, they don’t get sick either, as they have been exposed to the weakened vaccine strain of the virus. This was actually thought to be an advantage of the oral polio vaccine, especially in areas with poor sanitation and hygiene. Still, vaccine shedding can be a problem if the person who is exposed has a severe immune system problem.
Fortunately, vaccine shedding is not usually a problem because:
Most vaccines are not live and don’t shed, including DTaP, Tdap, flu shots, Hib, hepatitis A and B, Prevnar, IPV, and the HPV and Meningococcal vaccines.
The oral polio vaccine is no longer used in the United States and many other countries where polio has been brought under control.
The MMR vaccine doesn’t cause shedding, except that the rubella part of the vaccine may rarely shed into breastmilk (since rubella is typically a mild infection in children, this isn’t a reason to not be vaccinated if you are breastfeeding.) What about the rare case of a person developing measles after getting the MMR vaccine? In addition to being extremely rare, it would also be extremely rare for a person to transmit the vaccine virus to another person after developing measles in this way. In fact, a systematic review of the MMR vaccine in 2016 “determined that there have been no confirmed cases of human-to-human transmission of the measles vaccine virus.”
The chicken pox vaccine doesn’t cause shedding unless your child develops the rare vesicular rash after getting vaccinated. The risk, however, is thought to be minimal and the CDC reports only five cases of transmission of varicella vaccine virus after immunization including over 55 million doses of vaccine.
The rotavirus vaccine only causes shedding in stool, so can be avoided with routine hygiene techniques, such as good hand washing, and if immunocompromised people avoid changing diapers for at least a week after a child gets a rotavirus vaccine
Transmission of the live, nasal spray flu vaccine has not occurred when evaluated in several settings, including people with HIV infection, children getting chemotherapy, and immunocompromised people in health-care settings
And of course, children shed viruses and are truly contagious if they aren’t vaccinated and naturally develop any of these vaccine-preventable diseases.
What You Need To Know About Live Vaccines
There are a few precautions to consider with live vaccines:
Although multiple live-virus vaccines can be given at the same time, if they aren’t given at the same time, you should wait at least four weeks before getting another live-virus vaccine so that they don’t interfere with each other.
It is usually recommended that children who might be getting a solid organ transplant be updated on their live-virus vaccines at least four weeks before the transplant.
In addition to children getting chemotherapy, children who are getting daily steroids for 14 days or more should delay getting live vaccines for at least three months. (Rather than being at risk for infection, however, this recommendation is usually made because the vaccine simply won’t work if a person is on steroids.)
Live vaccines are reportedly being developed to protect against West Nile virus, respiratory syncytial virus (RSV,) Parainfluenza virus, herpes simplex, cytomegalovirus (CMV,)

Inflammatory Foods make me put on weight! Madonna Guy ND

October 26th, 2017
I have a confession to make. I’ve weighed myself every morning for at least 15 years, probably 20 or more, and I have at least 8 years of that on a spreadsheet, so I exactly what happens when I eat certain foods, or drink certain things.  I know that if I drink beer, eat nachos, bread, pasta, pizza – I’ll put on a kilo or two over night and it’ll take days to get rid of if I’m really really good!
Clients are often surprised when they start the weight loss journey how quickly they put on weight if they go to a party, eat out a few nights a week, have friends over several nights in a row… I suppose I’m never surprised.  People are equally surprised and think it’s not normal if the weight goes up a kilo or two with an average western diet…
There are many inflammatory foods these days – which increase your body’s need to store FLUID, which means you gain much more weight than the ‘weight’ of the food.  In other words, that sandwich might only weigh 200g but you might gain a kilo of fluid as well, if grains are inflammatory for you…
Then most inflammatory foods are:
Grains:  glutens, rice (for many people), GMO soy, wheat
Alcohol:  all.  The least inflammatory drink is vodka, soda and lime..  Make it your mantra!!
Sugar:  every 10-13 tsp sugar (1 bottle coke) reduces your immune system by 10%.  10%!!!!!  That’s massive!
GMO Foods/Animal Products:  nearly always require more pesticides, more antibiotics, more vaccines
Non-Purified Water:  chlorine and fluoride slow down your metabolism and can add to thyroid issues
Dairy:  for many people dairy is inflammatory, especially with grains!  (cereal and milk; pizza; cheese on burgers…)   On it’s own often people can handle it.  Organic dairy is often fine as there are less lectins, less hormones, less pesticides (from the foods the cows are eating)
“Life” means I have techniques like HCG, steak days, apple days, products to support faster metabolism and better detox processes up my sleeve and run a round of HCG when I need to…
I believe that part of the reason people are overweight these days is because we don’t weigh ourselves often enough. But how can we maintain health without information? We know so many health issues are challenged with excess weight, it seems like such silly advice for people not to keep an eye on it.
I love our testing.
I love HCG.
I love feeling my correct weight for me.
At New Leaf we can do testing to find out what foods are right for you!  Which weight loss process and/or detoxification process is right for you!
Have a beautiful day everyone!
Madonna Guy ND
healthteam@newleafnaturaltherapies.com.au
07 3348 6098     /      0417 643 849
YouTube:  New Leaf Health Team

To Learn or Not to Learn! Why?? Is the Question….. By Dr Charles Krebs

October 25th, 2017

Note from Madonna Guy ND: LEAP Practitioner & Naturopath

I’ve been doing kinesiology since 1996 and have been doing LEAP for over 12 years.  It is a growing science – and the complications of today’s children’s with poor diets, sugar intake, lack of fruit, vegetables, organic proteins, high use of medications and increasing numbers of vaccinations – the problems we see at New Leaf Natural Therapies are more and more complicated. 

Occasionally we get children where we can modify the diet and improve brain integration and they flourish.  Occasionally!  What’s more often is that the Primitive Reflexes have been jammed due to a stressful pregnancy; the vaccinations have weakened the immunity; the family situation has created stress and chaos in our young ones’ life. 

We can help!  We can look after our children!

Logical Creative Brain

 

TO LEARN OR NOT TO LEARN? – WHY? IS THE QUESTION!

An introduction to the Learning Enhancement Acupressure Program – LEAP by Charles T. Krebs, Ph.D. Developer of LEAP

Introduction to Learning Difficulties All learning dysfunctions, hence difficulty in learning, have their root in how the brain functions. The brain is designed to learn. From the time we are born until we die, learning is as natural as breathing, and certainly as important since our very survival depends on it. Initially it is our physical survival that depends on learning “Look both ways before crossing the road”. Later, in technological societies, it is our economic survival and success that are dependent upon what we learned in our educational and training environments.

Since learning is so natural, why is it that some of us learn easily and others learn only with difficulty? Why do some of us have a difficult time learning traditional skills such as reading, spelling, and mathematics?

It may be said that it is all a matter of access: what brain functions you can access, how well you can access the functions available, and what you have to access. A person with low innate intelligence, but full access to all brain functions may find learning difficult. On the other hand, a person of high innate intelligence, but with problems accessing specific brain functions may also experience difficulty learning, at least in some areas.

The brain functions much like water running down a hill; it will always take the most direct processing route available. Unimpeded, water will always run straight down the hill, but if its path is blocked, it will seek the next most direct route down the hill. If that path is also blocked, it will again seek the next most direct route, etc. Each time it is blocked, the pathway becomes longer and less efficient at getting the water down the hill.

The same is true of processing in the brain. If all functions are equally accessible, the brain will always choose the simplest, most direct functions to do the processing required. However, there are many ways of performing all mental tasks and the brain will just choose the next most efficient route for processing, if the most direct function is not available/accessible for whatever reason. If the next most efficient pathway is also blocked, the brain will then route the processing to other functions that are accessible, even if these functions are a far less efficient way of processing that information.

If many brain functions are not accessible, the processing path may become very long and inefficient creating difficulties in doing tasks dependent upon these processes. Each time the processing path becomes longer and less efficient, the level of “stress” encountered using that pathway increases. When the level of “stress” reaches a high enough level, we may opt out of situations that require us to access these functions altogether.

Different learning tasks require access to different functions and/or combinations of functions in the brain. The brain can be divided into several functional regions, each of which processes information in different and often unique ways. The two brain regions recognised most commonly by people are the right and left cerebral hemispheres. When the brain is removed from the skull, it appears to have two distinct “halves” because of the deep longitudinal fissure separating the cerebral hemispheres (Fig. 1).

In the popular press these are often referred to as the “right and left brains” because of their anatomical distinctness and the differences in the way each hemisphere processes information.

These two hemispheres are not separate, however, as they are connected along most of their length at the bottom of the fissure by a structure called the Corpus Callosum (Fig. 1). Neurologically, the Corpus Callosum is approximately 200 million nerve fibres running between the two hemispheres. It functions much like a telephone exchange allowing a two way flow of communication between the hemispheres. Whenever the hemispheres are required to “work together” to produce an integrated function, the Corpus Callosum is the site of that integration.

Each cerebral hemisphere carries out a number of different functions, and each processes information in a very different way from its partner. It is as if each side of the brain is a specialised organ of thought, with the right hemisphere possessing a set of functions that complement those of the left hemisphere and vice versa (See Table 1). The right hemisphere functions in most people are global or Gestalt in nature dealing with the whole and recognition of overall patterns, while the left hemisphere functions in most people deal with logically sequenced analysis of the parts of the whole. It is because of these differences in functions and processing that the right hemisphere is sometimes called the “Right” or “Gestalt” brain and the left hemisphere the “Left” or “Logic” brain.

Table 1. Functions of and Information Processing in the Right and Left Hemispheres in most people.

GESTALT (typically right) HEMISPHERE FUNCTIONS:

  • Spatial Orientation Body Awareness Facial Recognition Music Recognition (melody)
  • Pre-verbal & Non-verbal (gestural)
  • Interpreting Symbols Creative/Lateral Thinking (daydreaming)
  • PROCESSES INFORMATION: Globally, Holistically as a Gestalt Simultaneously Subjectively Intuitively “Knowing” based on intuition

LOGIC (typically left) HEMISPHERE FUNCTIONS:

  • Temporal (time) Mathematics Rhythm Language (verbal)
  • Assigning Meaning to Symbols
  • PROCESSES INFORMATION: Linearly, Logically and Analytically Sequentially Objectively (with reference to “Facts)

While the popular press may refer to it as right and left brain thinking, it is not the physical hemispheres housing these functions that is important, but rather the location of the Gestalt and Logic functions themselves.

In some individuals these cerebral functions may be transposed with the Gestalt functions physically located in the left hemisphere and the Logic functions physically located in the right hemisphere. By the definition of the popular press, these people would have their “right brain” in their “left brain”, which doesn’t make any sense. They just happen to have their Gestalt functions located in their left hemisphere and their Logic functions located in their right hemisphere.

About 3-5% of people, however, display transposed Logic and Gestalt functions with 95-97% of people having their Logic functions in their left and their Gestalt functions in their right hemispheres.

Because the dominant hand tends to be opposite the Logic hemisphere, most people are right-handed, while many people with transposed functions (e.g. Logic right) tend to be left-handed or ambidextrous.

It must be emphatically stated here that both hemispheres participate all the time at many levels in the “various thought processes.” The way we learn is a result of the degree of integration of the two hemispheres, with each hemisphere contributing its own special capacities to all cognitive activities.

The contrasting, yet complementary, contributions of each hemisphere are clearly demonstrated during complex mental activities such as reading as illustrated in the following quote from Levy:

“When a person reads a story, the right hemisphere may play a special role in decoding visual information, maintaining an integrated story structure, appreciate humour and emotional content, deriving meaning from past associations, and understanding metaphor. At the same time, the left hemisphere plays a special role in understanding syntax, translating written words into their phonetic representations and deriving meaning from complex relationships among word concepts and syntax.” (1)

Although there is no activity in which only one hemisphere is involved, or to which one hemisphere makes the only contribution, functions predominantly in one cerebral hemisphere may be all that are required for many simple cognitive tasks.

There is both psychological and physiological evidence that the relative degree of activation of functions in the two hemispheres varies depending upon the nature of the task being performed. When doing simple arithmetic tasks such as counting or adding 1 + 1, the Logic functions will be activated with little Gestalt activity required. A predominantly Gestalt task, on the other, such as matching patterns, will require little Logic involvement. The more complex the learning task becomes, the greater the required degree of activation and integration of functions in both hemispheres.

Different learning tasks, therefore, require access to different types of functions, and different degrees of integration of these functions. Some of these functions are located predominantly in the Gestalt/right brain, while others are located predominantly in the Logic/left brain. The more complex learning tasks like reading and spelling require access not only to functions in both hemispheres, but the integration and simultaneous processing of information in both hemispheres. Therefore, if you can access all brain functions in both cerebral hemispheres with equal facility and can integrate all these functions well, you will probably find learning easy!

However, if for any reason you cannot access certain brain functions or have difficulty integrating the functions accessed, you may well have difficulty performing tasks dependent upon or involving those specific brain functions. From our perspective, all specific learning difficulties result from some lack of access to specific functions or the inability to effectively integrate these functions (assuming there are no organic problems). Depending upon how well a person can access certain Gestalt and/or Logic functions, he will demonstrate one of the patterns of specific learning difficulties briefly discussed below.

 

Major Patterns of Specific Learning Difficulties Based on How Well Logic and Gestalt Functions are Accessed or Integrated:

  1. Gestalt Dominance in Mental Processing (Attention Deficit Disorder): The most commonly observed specific learning difficulty is Gestalt dominance in processing information or Attention Deficit Disorder (A.D.D.). People with this pattern of learning dysfunction have good access to most Gestalt functions, but only poor access to Logic functions, with Gestalt processing the predominate mode used for performing all tasks. Because of this Gestalt dominance in processing information, the normal balance provided by complementary Logic functions is largely absent.These people, therefore, often display the following symptoms: tendency to be impulsive. little appreciation of the connection between “cause” and “effect”. I want to do “X”, so I do it, never thinking, “What will happen if I do” difficulty budgeting time.Because of this and difficulty concentrating, projects are often left incomplete and organisational skills are poor. difficulty concentrating. “Concentration is merely paying attention over time. If there is no “Sense of Time”, attention cannot be paid over it? difficulty spelling. Generally spelling is phonetic by putting letters together until it “sounds” like the word; difficulty with mathematics; Difficulty remembering times tables and/or under standing mathematical concepts. poor reading comprehension. Reading may be fluent, but there is often poor comprehension of what was read. difficulty assigning meaning to words and symbols. Interpretation of symbols (Gestalt) may be accessible, but there is difficulty assigning meaning to the words/symbols interpreted (Logic); good coordination. Often well coordinated or even gifted athletically. Remember the Gestalt functions control body awareness and orientation in space.It is precisely because of the above symptoms that people displaying Gestalt-dominant processing are found to be “attention deficit”. Attention Deficit Disorder is assessed by having a person perform a series of sequential tasks, any one of which the person can do easily. However, people suffering from A.D.D. are unlikely to complete the series of tasks, not because they can not perform them, but rather, because they lose concentration or are easily distracted.
  2. Logic Dominance in Mental Processing (Dyslexia):   That is, they display the following four behavioural symptoms:Much less common than Gestalt dominance is Logic dominance in decision-making processing. People who access their Gestalt functions poorly, but have good access to Logic functions are the true dyslexics” by standard psychological definition.
  • cannot spell or do so in some phonetic form by putting letters together to approximate the “sound” of the word.
  • have great difficulty reading. Usually stumble over words, misread words, or just cannot “sound” words out. However, comprehension of what was read is often excellent. display dysrhythmia.
  • An inability to clap or tap a tune. poor coordination. Are physically uncoordinated or”clumsy”. In addition, these people are usually good at mathematics at least to the level of algebra, display good concentration, and
  • follow sequential directions well. However, they may have to be taught things that other people learn unconsciously.
  1. Limited Access to both Gestalt and Logic Functions (Severe Problems): The next most common type of learning difficulty, after Attention Deficit Disorder or Gestalt Dominance, is poor or limited access to both Gestalt and Logic functions.This pattern is usually associated with a great deal of confusion in cerebral processing and creates the greatest learning difficulties. If a person has good access to either Gestalt or Logic, but poor access to the opposite side functions, he or she can at least compensate sate with the functions he or she does access well.If there are major deficits in both Gestalt and Logic functions, then the ability of the brain to compensate for these deficits is extremely limited. The following behavioural symptoms result from this pattern of access:
  • language delay. Language development is often extremely delayed for age. For instance, an eight year old child may only recognise 3 letters and 2 numbers. reading very delayed for age.
  • Often difficulty with recognising words, or word recognition is a real struggle.
  • spelling very delayed for age. Often cannot spell words with more than 3 or 4 letters.
  • difficulty understanding numbers, including basic arithmetic. Often having difficulties with learning to count, concepts of adding and subtraction, knowing the days of the week, etc. no concentration or focus.
  • Appear “away with the fairies”. person appears confused/lazy or just plain “slow mentally”. Often fairly apathetic and lethargic with no zest for life.We generally see these people as children early on. Because of the extreme nature of their learning dysfunctions, these people have normally been dismal failures in school and have departed the academic scene by their early teenage years.
  1. Poor Integration of Gestalt and Logic Functions: The least common pattern of learning difficulty is among people who have good access to both Gestalt and Logic functions, but can only “integrate” these functions poorly if at all.The lack of integration of Gestalt and Logic functions often limits the use of the functions that they can access giving rise to learning dysfunctions similar to people having poor access to one or the other hemispheres. The most common symptoms are: reading difficulties. Often so stressful to read that it can only be done for a few minutes at a time, or is avoided altogether. spelling is totally phonetic. Words spelled like they “sound”. difficulty with higher mathematics (e.g. algebra) even though arithmetic may have been perfected. For these people, school is often an extremely frustrating experience. They can usually perform all tasks well except those requiring good integrated function. Since integration of Gestalt and Logic functions are required for reading and spelling, but integrated functions are very stressful for these people to perform, these essential academic tasks are likely to be avoided.

The True Nature of Specific Learning Difficulties: Our philosophy regarding Specific Learning Difficulties is that most learning difficulties result from the degree of access each person has to specific brain functions and how well these functions can be integrated. If a person can access all brain functions in both cerebral hemispheres with equal facility and can integrate all these functions, he or she performs well In all areas of learning. However, if for any reason he or she cannot access certain specific brain functions, he or she will have difficulty performing the tasks dependent upon, or involving, those specific brain functions.

Standard psychological testing to evaluate specific learning problems rely on determining which types of cerebral functions and processes can be accessed, and how well these functions are accessed.

Standardised intelligence tests such as the Wechsler Intelligence Scale Test are a carefully devised series of tasks which are divided into two groups: Verbal sub-tests and Performance sub-tests. The Verbal sub-tests are tasks which require access to predominantly Logic functions. Some of the Verbal sub-tests require access to only a few Logic functions, while others require access to both Logic and Gestalt functions at the same time, but with the lead functions contributed by the Logic brain. Likewise, some of the Performance sub tests are tasks which require access to only Gestalt functions, while others require integrated functions with a Gestalt “lead”. The score on each sub-test depends largely upon how well a person can access the specific functions required to perform that sub-test. Sub-tests In which a person scores poorly indicate which types of functions are difficult to access. Difficulty in accessing specific functions has been correlated with poor performance in certain academic areas.

 

Behavioural Aspects of Limited Access to Cerebral Functions and/or Poor Integration of these Functions

An appreciation of some of the behaviours associated with learning difficulties may be useful at this point. How do people’s behaviour reflect their underlying ability to participate in this natural process of learning? In clinical practice we are told about and see the same types of behaviours from people (especially children) who present for treatment of specific learning difficulties.

Again and again we see the same behaviours ticked on the Behavioural Evaluation Form filled out for each client when people have certain learning dysfunctions. Why might this be? Lack of access to specific cerebral functions will almost always have a discernible behavioural corollary.

The nature of the functions accessed, or not accessed determine to a large degree how a person behaves. A child that is Gestalt dominant will often be perceived as “emotionally immature” because emotional maturity is essentially the ability to modulate and control the expression of emotions based on a logical analysis of circumstances. A well-integrated person with good access to all cerebral functions may “feel” angry (largely a Gestalt experience), but make the rational judgment that “now” is not the appropriate time to express that anger.

A Gestalt dominant person, on the other hand, will experience the anger and tend to act on these feelings with little logical consideration of the consequences. It is our philosophy that people’s behaviour reflects the degree of access and integration of their cerebral functions. Poor access to, or integration of, specific brain functions will result in difficulty performing tasks dependent upon these brain functions. Difficulty performing these tasks will almost always generate “stress” when attempting to do these tasks, often resulting in “avoidance behaviours.” The extent of the “avoidance behaviours” usually relates to the degree of “stress” generated when attempting to access and integrate the relevant functions.

What is often not appreciated is that people’s behaviour tells the truth, if you understand what is being said! When a child says, “I hate Reading, Mathematics, English, etc”, what that person is actually saying is, “I cannot access the brain functions I need to do that task easily. The only reason anyone “hates” doing anything, that is enjoyable for most other people, is that he finds that specific task difficult to perform.

If a person can read well and easily, reading isn’t avoided , but rather sought out because there is just so much to learn and enjoy in books. If, on the other hand, reading is a very demanding and stressful task, people soon develop avoidance mechanisms, for instance labelling reading as “boring.” Who wants to do something that is “BORING”

Unfortunately, these avoidance behaviours are often misinterpreted as “just not doing what you are told” or “misbehaviour” plain and simple. The response to these “avoidance behaviours” may be to tell the person to just stop misbehaving and “pick up your game” This only compounds the “stress” of attempting to do these tasks, usually leading to further avoidance behaviours, and exaggerated misbehaviour. Part of what exaggerates the misbehaviour is simply the frustration and anger of NOT being able to perform the assigned task, even when great effort is expended. Imagine how you would feel if you have struggled through your reading, mathematics, English etc. assignments, putting in the best effort you are capable of, only to be told, “Well you’re just going to have to try harder!”

From our experience, many of the people having the greatest difficulty with “learning” are often innately very clever. They just cannot access the specific brain functions they need to perform certain tasks. When you talk with these people and listen to the questions they ask, they are often clearly, intelligent people. If a clearly, intelligent person does not read well or spell well, or has great difficulty understanding and doing even simple mathematics, a reasonable assumption is that person just isn’t “concentrating”, or “paying attention” or “trying hard enough.”.

Surely, if an intelligent person was “concentrating, paying attention, and trying hard enough”, then he or she would be successful at these rather pedestrian tasks, accomplished with ease by even their less clever peers. What is over-looked is that these, intelligent people may indeed be clever and intelligent, but unable to access the relevant brain function, or only able to do so under duress.

Perhaps an analogy here will help demonstrate the above point. If I say to a handy- person, “Do you know how to hammer a nail?”, most would answer,”yes”. To the question “Will you hammer a nail for me?”, they would answer, “Sure, just give me a hammer”. However, if their hands were tied to their legs, they may still answer “yes” to the question, “Do you know how to hammer a nail?”, because they do know how; but, they would be unable to do so when asked.

If you just ignored their lack of access to hand function (because it is tied up) and said “Come on now, hammer that nail, they may become frustrated and angry because they could hammer that nail if only they could access the function of their tied-up hands.

The difference between this analogy and the above lack of access to brain functions is that they would clearly understand their inability to hammer the nail, and they would likely state, “If you’ll just untie my hands, I’ll gladly do it for you”, letting you know why they can’t at this time do what is asked of them, also alleviating their frustration at not being able to do so.

However, with lack of access to specific brain functions, people cannot understand (nor can those around them) why they cannot perform certain tasks dependent upon the specific brain functions not accessed! The individual is unlikely to consciously know why he can’t access these specific brain functions, and just becomes “frustrated”, which often leads to “anger” and that anger often leads to “inappropriate behaviour.”

LEAP (LEARNING ENHANCEMENT ADVANCED PROGRAMME) – LEARNING CORRECTION PROGRAMME:

The program is centred around a powerful brain integration technique initially developed by Richard Utt, Founder and President of the International Institute of Applied Physiology in Tucson Arizona, and Dr. Charles Krebs, co-founder of Melbourne Applied Physiology with Susan McCrossin.

This brain integration technique opens up access to both Gestalt and Logic functions and removes blocks to integrated function. Further research and development of specific correction techniques by co-founders of Melbourne Applied Physiology, Dr. Charles Krebs (a past research scientist and university lecturer in anatomy and physiology) and psychologist Susan McCrossin, now allow the correction of most specific learning difficulties.

The Basic Learning Correction Program requires twelve to fifteen hours of treatment. This includes an initial assessment that serves as a benchmark against which to evaluate future change, and points out the areas needing the most attention. The next several hours are devoted to Brain Integration which lays the foundation for the specific learning corrections that follow. Much like building a house, there is little sense in putting time and effort into creating a functional structure unless it rests on a solid foundation.

The Brain Integration procedure releases stresses in the deep brain centres, including the Limbic System, which control access to and integration of hemisphere functions.

Once the Brain Integration procedures are complete, we then apply specific learning corrections for dysfunctions in reading skills and comprehension, spelling, mathematics, and the whole range of Wechsler Intelligence Scale sub-tests.

When all the functional areas have been addressed, low self-esteem and behavioural problems related to the previous learning difficulties are addressed using effective emotional and memory stress release (defusion) techniques. Just because you now can perform a learning task well does not mean that you will. Previous conditioning and memory of “how it was”, often shut off our will to give it a go. All correction techniques used are non-invasive. The techniques are based on the use of muscle monitoring, acupressure, emotional and memory release, and sound and light techniques, together with other left/right brain integration exercises.

 

A typical Learning Correction Program may look like –

Initial Consultation (1-1.5 hrs)

  • discussion of areas of concern
  • detailed assessment to determine the learning strengths and weaknesses
  • determination of a treatment plan with an estimate of how many sessions it is likely to take (typically 12x1hr)
  • referral for additional treatment if considered necessary

 

Subsequent sessions

  • correction of deep levels of confusion in the nervous system
  • establishing a stable foundation of brain integration – even under stress
  • increase the access to brain areas or functions identified as problems in the initial consultation
  • overcoming self esteem issues and forming positive attitudes to learning

 

Reassessment

  • checking that all the learning functions have been corrected
  • giving follow up exercises
  • arranging tutoring or a home reinforcement
  • self help program with parents

 

Follow up

  • 2-3 months after the final consultation, to check on progress and correct any further problems that may have arisen.

 

The basic 12-14 hour program is an estimate based on the median time for treatment, as each person’s program will vary on the basis of their individual needs. The median time is the length of treatment that occurs most often. Some people with only one or two areas of deficit may take only 10 hours to go through the whole program, while others with many areas of deficit may take far longer.

 

Children with severe learning problems and major deficits in most areas of function indicated by Low Average, Borderline, or Serious Deficit ranking on standardized tests, may require up twenty to thirty hours of treatment or more. Our experience is that even these children improve significantly in function, but that the rate of improvement is slower than for people with less severe deficits.

At the end of the initial Assessment during the first session, you will be advised of the probable length of treatment required in your specific case, along with any additional structural areas you may find benefit in addressing separately.

 

Further Reading on LEAP Krebs, Dr. Charles, 1998, A Revolutionary Way of Thinking, Hill of Content Publishing Co. Pty Ltd